Container herbs

first_imgAfter seeing some incredible mixed containers, I told my young horticulturist son that I had a vision of writing a column called “Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme,” kind of a play-on-words idea from Simon and Garfunkel’s famous album by the same name and, of course, the lyrics from the song, “Scarborough Fair.” The idea of my column is to encourage you to use these herbs in mixed containers.But it appears my 26-year-old never heard of the artist, album or song. What has happened to the world? We spent weeks in Mr. Murray’s 1969 English class studying these songs and it was the best class ever, but I digress.Just know this – remembering those four herbs as you design your mixed containers will allow you to create interest through foliage, add a touch of fragrance, dazzle with color from flowers, bring in a few butterflies and, shoot, freshen your breath, too. Lastly, if you are a culinary artist, then all of these are available for the picking.Parsley is the most famous garnish on the planet. As a carnivorous meat eater, I would just as soon skip the parsley and add a couple of more ounces of New York strip. Speaking of New York, The Times ran an article that said there’s no way parsley freshens your breath, that the science is just not there. Of course, the Romans felt differently and it must have been famous at the Scarborough Fair. As a horticulturist, however, I love curly parsley as a 1-foot-tall filler plant in mixed containers. Its bright-green leaves just seem to bring out the color of companion flowers.Sages are my favorite plants for gardens and mixed containers. Now we have to assume for lyrical purposes that we are talking the edible sage, Salvia officinalis. Of course other species are edible, including the heavenly scented pineapple sage, Salvia elegans. The Salvia officinalis excels as a filler plant in mixed containers, and the new variegated varieties do their part to add a little drama. This plant sometimes struggles in the high heat and humidity of the South when planted in garden soil, but always performs in mixed containers that drain freely. Drop it in with some ajuga at the front of your box or mixed container and you’ll have yourself a picture.We may think of rosemary as the now-official Christmas topiary or the staple of the herb garden, and both would be correct, but it also makes a terrific center or tall plant in mixed containers. The aromatic foliage does not go unnoticed as you walk by. The green, fine-textured, needle-like leaves contrast with cool- or warm-season flowers as well as a boxwood or holly. Throughout Georgia, they are beginning their bloom cycle as they load up with icy blue flowers. A sprig or two may be just what you are looking for, whether you’re making pork or poultry.Thyme is something I’ve generally used among rocks or stepping stones. The little, if not diminutive, creeping red thyme, however, is a wonderful spiller, creating interest with its tiny foliage texture, then follows up with its own version of “wow!” with flowers that may be rose, lavender, red or white. It’s like the engine that could, and you will be asking why you haven’t tried this before. It grows 3 inches to 6 inches tall and spreads to 18 inches.Spring planting season is coming, albeit sooner for some of us. Herbs make wonderful component plants in mixed containers. If you can’t remember which herbs to use, let the old song remind you: parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme.Follow me on Twitter @CGBGgardenguru. For more information about the Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens in Savannah, go to www.coastalgeorgiabg.org/.last_img read more

Soak up the views from this spectacular Gold Coast apartment

first_img1/174 Pacific Pde, Bilinga. 1/174 Pacific Pde, Bilinga. MORE NEWS: Beachfront home a real price winner An open kitchen, living and dining room is at the heart of the apartment with ocean views setting a picturesque backdrop.The plunge pool is on the apartment’s rear terrace.The furniture could come with the apartment but it would need to be negotiated while body corporate fees are $68.47 per week.Mr Smith said the building was designed for owner-occupiers who were downsizing from a house but didn’t want a place that was too small. MORE NEWS: Gold Coast losing land sales to Logan 1/174 Pacific Pde, Bilinga. Its proximity to the beach, cafes and restaurants at Kirra and Coolangatta as well as the Gold Coast Airport also made it appealing to prospective buyers.Marketing agent David Stringer said it was the perfect opportunity to snap up a beachfront unit close to all the action.“Whether you are looking for a personal residence, retirement venue or a family holiday vacationer to enjoy with family and friends, Bluewater is a refreshing choice,” he said. 1/174 Pacific Pde, Bilinga. 1/174 Pacific Pde, Bilinga. 1/174 Pacific Pde, Bilinga. Owner Greg Smith, who developed the boutique residential building with his brother Steve under Pacific View Developments, said the apartment was in a good spot.“For a ground floor unit, it’s got really good views, especially from the lounge and kitchen area,” he said.“That unit has its own splash pool as well.”The apartment has three bedrooms, all of which have ensuites. The main bedroom also has a walk-in wardrobe and access to the front terrace.More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa14 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days ago 1/174 Pacific Pde, Bilinga.IT may be on the ground floor of a new beachfront development but this apartment still has ocean views.It is one of 12 apartments spread over seven floors in Bilinga’s Bluewater on Pacific building.last_img read more

USG-funded speaker event draws criticism

first_imgStudents from a variety of ideologies are coming together in protest of the Undergraduate Student Government’s decision to provide funding to help bring a controversial speaker to campus Thursday.Students for Justice in Palestine has arranged to host Norman Finkelstein as part of Palestine Awareness Week. Finkelstein has argued that some Jews have exploited the Holocaust and his appearance on campus has raised eyebrows. Students are more concerned, however, about the source of funding for the event than about the event itself.SJP submitted an application to USG’s Discretionary Funding Board for money to help bring Finkelstein to campus. The application met USG’s guidelines, and SJP was granted the requested funds. The Discretionary Funding Board money comes from the student programming fee — the $55.50 fee each student pays every semester.Student organizations, including ’SC Students for Israel, College Democrats, College Republicans and several others, wrote and submitted a letter to USG expressing concern that USG was using student activity money to fund as controversial a speaker as Finkelstein, who they called a Holocaust-denier outside the realm of academia.“We’re very opposed to him receiving USC money for his visit,” said Lauren Korbatov, director of public relations for College Republicans. “It’s like bringing a guy that said slavery never happened in the United States.”Korbatov and others noted that they are not against freedom of speech; they simply disagree with the use of student funds in sponsoring some events.“We support freedom of speech but we don’t support funding a speaker like this,” said Aaron Perman, vice president of College Democrats.Shanel Melamed, president of ’SC Students for Israel, echoed this sentiment.“My concern is that we go to a truly amazing school,” she said. “The money that we pay for the school and the student activity fee should be going toward civilized academic discussion … how can the school fund a speaker that supports violence against Israelis?”Ashwin Appiah, USG’s treasurer, said USG makes funding decisions based on a set of guidelines, and Finkelstein’s visit met all the requirements.“We stay neutral in the events that we fund,” Appiah said. “We do not judge on content. Every student deserves this money as much as the other.”The issue was brought to the attention of the Office of Student Affairs, but Vice President for Student Affairs Michael Jackson said he was not involved in the decision to fund the event.“It is not up to me, for example, to censor a program that our student government has agreed that they want to support,” Jackson said. “I’ve never censored a student event, and I’m not going to start now … Students would be very mad at me.”Marwa Katbi, a member of SJP, said the group considered a number of speakers before choosing Finkelstein.“He’s a speaker who can provide students with a different perspective on the [Israeli-Palestinian] conflicts from what people normally hear,” she said.Finkelstein will speak about the contents of his latest book, This Time We Went Too Far, about the most recent massacre in Gaza and the different pressures within the Jewish community that challenge racist policies in Israel. Katbi said she hopes students will come out to hear the talk.“With issues of controversy, it would be unfortunate if this opportunity to learn was bypassed for the comfort and convenience of the community,” Katbi said.SJP expects about 100 attendees and has talked to university officials about preparing for any protests or acts of opposition, Katbi said. Though Finkelstein requests security not be present at his lectures, Department of Public Safety officials are aware of the situation and are prepared to intervene as needed.Students not involved in the event or the protest expressed mixed feelings about whether or not USG should use the student programming fee to fund controversial events and speakers.Melissa Gish, a junior majoring in chemistry, suggested that USG sponsor a debate to ensure views on both sides of the issue are heard.Others, however, said they do not think USG should judge the content of events looking for funding.“I think you can’t discriminate based on a person’s opinion,” said Swade Geiger, a sophomore majoring in mechanical engineering. “It’s up to us whether or not we listen to what he says. We give [USG] our right to decide who comes.”USG has since responded to the letter from the student groups, explaining  in an e-mail USG’s procedure for granting student organizations funding. But Melamed felt the e-mail was an “informal response” to their letter and did not address her concerns.“For the school to fund an individual who is going to stand there and say that it’s OK for me to be killed is really, really scary, and I myself, I’m getting scared for my security,” Melamed said.Correction: The original version of this article included an unattributed claim that Norman Finkelstein is said to be a Holocaust denier. Finkelstein has argued that some Jews have exploited the Holocaust, but he is not a Holocaust denier.last_img read more