Sentenced to nine months on burglary charge

first_imgHAVING been earlier refused bail, a Limerickman appeared at the District Court in connection with an alleged burglary matter after he was arrested on foot of a separate bench warrant issued by the Criminal Courts of Justice at Cloverhill.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Charges of the theft of a mobile phone at Abrakebabra restaurant on O’Connell Street, on July 13, were also before the court, where it is alleged that the accused, Lee McNamara, approached the counter and stole the phone, valued at €450, after he allegedly forced open the door at 9am, while cleaning staff were working inside.On July 16 last, Gardai attended the reports of a break-in at Johnsgate Village where the defendant was spotted exiting a premises through a broken window.McNamara, aged 23, and described in court as “homeless,” was arrested by gardai and made admissions to bwweing on the premises. No property was stolen in the incident.A third charge relating to public order offences was also before the court where it was given in evidence that on June 17 last, the accused was intoxicated on Cruises Street, and was stopping members of the public asking for cigarettes. McNamara had 17 previous convictions and received an eight month prison sentence in January for Road Traffic Offences, and the unauthorised taking of a vehicle and associated charges.In mitigation for the accused, Sarah Ryan solicitor, said that her client was taking shelter from bad weather when he was seen at the address in Johnsgate and was of the belief that it was a simple trespassing charge of the unoccupied house.It was also added that the McNamara was in fact homeless, and that the address given was a family home that he did not reside at. McNamara, who was in custody since the previous Sunday, entered an early plea.Judge Eamon O’Brien jailed him for nine months. Previous articleLimerick lose bravely in Croke ParkNext articleCharges struck out against father and daughter admin Facebook Twitter Email WhatsAppcenter_img Advertisement Linkedin Print NewsLocal NewsSentenced to nine months on burglary chargeBy admin – August 2, 2011 691 last_img read more

Event tackles use of racial slur against two USC students

first_imgZiru Ling | Daily TrojanAgainst hate · Lisa Hines, Melina Abdullah, Pete White and Nyallah Noah discussed Black Lives Matter and relevant issues on Thursday.Every seat in the Sol Price School of Public Policy auditorium on Thursday evening was covered with a paper that said, “Two students were called ‘n—gger’ today.” The flyers, which referenced two incidents of bias that had flared up on campus in recent days, were part of a panel discussion on the status of the Black Lives Matter movement and its role following the election of Donald Trump to the presidency. The panelists included Lisa Hines, the mother of a woman who died while in LAPD custody; Melina Abdullah, a professor of pan-African studies at California State University, Los Angeles; Pete White, founder of the Los Angeles Community Action Network; and Nyallah Noah, a sophomore majoring in popular music and a member of Black Lives Matter LA. The event was moderated by LaMikia Castillo, an adjunct professor at the Price School. Trump has long been accused of racism by activists due to his encouragement of stricter policing as well as support he has received from white supremacists like the Ku Klux Klan. Over the past several days, claims of racist acts carried out by his supporters have appeared across the nation. Noah expressed her astonishment at the continuing racism around the country and her realization of the necessity of movements such as Black Lives Matter movement.“The reality is that this country isn’t that open-minded and that there’s a lot of hatred around this country that was suppressed during the Obama era that is finally coming out,” Noah said. “Just as we want to see change, they want to see their type of change as well. That’s why this movement is so much more important now than it ever was.”Abdullah said that a sustained movement was all the more necessary because anger at injustice couldn’t just flare up every time someone is killed, as it did during a series of highly publicized police shootings of unarmed black people across the country over the past few years. “We have to engage in the black radical tradition,” Abdullah said. “And for me, the question is what the black radical tradition looks like now. I find the answer in Black Lives Matter, and feel that Black Lives Matter supports who I am as a black mother.”Hines had a more personal reason for joining Black Lives Matter. Following the death of her daughter Wakiesha Wilson, who was found in a Los Angeles jail days after missing her trial in court, Hines immediately joined the movement to support other individuals facing forms of oppression.“My daughter is not resting, and will not rest, until we get justice,” Hines said. “For me, the only way I can get justice is by being part of a movement that stands up to our oppressors. You don’t want to get involved until it happens to you, and now even though it’s for my own child that I’m fighting for, I know that it’s not all about her — it’s about all of us.”Some of the goals of the Black Lives Matter movement, White said, are to promote equality of diverse groups, to ensure the safety of black people across the country and to decrease funding for the police. For the final goal, White rationalized the importance of using funds from police departments to instead create larger budgets for housing and other safety nets for underprivileged groups. Beyond that, however, White discussed the subliminal threat police represent through historical instances of police brutality against the black community.“Police are not just slave catchers — at every point in history, they were used to oppress any movement that attempted to create greater equity,” White said. “That’s why a big goal of Black Lives Matter is to decrease funding for the police — because at a certain point, the police are no longer keeping us safe.”Abdullah added that one of the best ways to support the movement is to show up.“Yes, we do need financial support among other kinds of support,” Abdullah said. “But beyond that, we need your skills — whatever you can bring to the table — whether it’s singing, dancing or just being present. That’s the most important thing we need from our black supporters and our allies in general: just be present, and that’ll make us that much stronger.”last_img read more

Goodbye Steamboats, Hello Herons

first_imgMonaghan explainedthe designs went throughmany iterations beforelanding on something thateveryone could agree on. “Herons are just so majestic,” she said. “My other favorite landmark is the train station,” she added and Mery agreed and said it connotes “home.” Monaghan made sure to add details like windowpanes on the train station and the window boxes below that, at the real train station, are always filled by the Little Silver Garden Club with plantings that reflect the season. The heron signs include nautical roping lashed around the top of the sign’s posts and Monaghan said she’s asked that the borough plant seagrass at the base to complete the water way feel. Six of the signs feature the distinctive Little Silver Train Station, a nod to the borough’s busy downtown hub, and two signs feature a white heron soaring over the water, a delightful sight for travelers traveling over the Gooseneck and Oceanport Avenue bridges. By Amy Byrnes At the end of October, new, cheerful “Welcome to Little Silver” signs started popping up around town, reflecting the borough’s history and geography. Silverweb designer and co-owner Nora Monaghan, who’s lived in Little Silver for 23 years, said she especially wanted to highlight Little Silver’s extensive water ways and the stately white birds that she sees whenever she’s driving in and out of the borough. The classic markers had a distinctly colonial vibe and featured illustrations of a steamboat and the year Little Silver was established. center_img Silverweb of Red Bank, a graphic design firm, created the new welcome signs. The firm had helped create a logo and website for recent Little Silver Day celebrations and was happy to work with the borough council members on the design, materials and size of the signs for the $19,000 capital improvement project. “It was really a compliment,” said Silverweb co-owner Jackie Mery. A heron is featured on new signs announcing Little Silver.Photo by Amy Byrnes Once they came up with two designs, the borough went out to four sign fabricators to bid on the project and the winner was Stone Graphics Company, Inc. in Farmingdale. Owner Chris Stone said they applied the same weather resistant paint process used for signs the company created for Walt Disney World in Orlando, Florida that’s durable and – depending on care and environmental conditions – should welcome visitors to Little Silver for years to come. But lately they had started to show their age and were “literally falling apart,” according to Mayor Robert Neff. Public works employees were finding sign parts in the grass. It seemed they were too far gone for fixing. “We thought it was time to bring the signs up to date,” he said. LITTLE SILVER – For decades, iconic carved wooden signs have welcomed people to the riverside borough. “I wanted it to be perfect,” she said.last_img read more