Flagstar SVP: Low Volume “Tension”

first_img The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago What are some of the biggest challenges and changes facing default servicing? At the 2019 Five Star Conference and Expo and how Courtney Thompson, SVP, Director of Default Servicing Operations at Flagstar Bank spoke with DS News on these subjects. According to Thompson, the biggest challenge for default servicers right now is volume.”In a lower volume environment, I think it creates a tension where we don’t have all the resources we need to prepare ourselves for when there is more” said Thompson. Flagstar SVP: Low Volume “Tension” Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Previous: Deputy Assistant Secretary Gisele Roget Leaves HUD Next: Renters Versus Homeowners: Housing Cost Burden default Inventory Volume 2019-11-11 Seth Welborn Sign up for DS News Daily Share Save Home / Daily Dose / Flagstar SVP: Low Volume “Tension” The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Seth Welborn is a Reporter for DS News and MReport. A graduate of Harding University, he has covered numerous topics across the real estate and default servicing industries. Additionally, he has written B2B marketing copy for Dallas-based companies such as AT&T. An East Texas Native, he also works part-time as a photographer. November 11, 2019 1,752 Views Tagged with: default Inventory Volumecenter_img Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Subscribe Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, News, Technology Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago  Print This Post The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Related Articles About Author: Seth Welbornlast_img read more

Girl Scouts Kick Off ‘Fall Product Program’

first_imgImage courtesy: Girl Scouts of Western New York.WESTERN NEW YORK – The Girl Scouts of Western New York kicked off their ‘Fall Product Program’ on Monday to help raise funds for programs, community service projects and other special activities.Group leaders say in addition to helping scouts fund their programs, the fundraiser also gives back to the military through the ‘Share Donation Program’ where customers can choose to purchase items to benefit local military personnel and veterans.Typically, scouts would travel ‘door-to-door’ to sell their cookies, however because of the COVID-19 pandemic, girls across Western New York are putting their technology skills to the test using an online digital platform to engage close friends, family, and the general public to order candies, nuts, magazines, and other related items.Program leaders say girls will be not only learn how to sell products online, but will gain money management skills as well. The community can also support a local Girl Scout by purchasing Thin Mints® Almonds, Peanut Butter Bears, Dulce de Leche Owls, English Butter Toffee, Dark Chocolate Mint Penguins, Dark Chocolate Caramel Caps with Sea Salt, Chocolate Covered Raisins, fat free Fruit Slices, Dill Pickle Flavored Peanuts, Salsa Mix, Whole Cashews with Sea Salt, and NEW this year – Peanut Butter Trail Mix. Prices range from $6 to $40.The program runs through October 28. For more, visit GSWNY.org. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Spinning Solar System Objects to Keep Them Old

first_imgIf you remove the obligation to think in billions of years, many phenomena in the solar system make more sense.PlutoMore anomalies on Pluto look young. “Pluto is coloured red by ammonia spewing from underneath its surface,” writes Leah Crane for New Scientist. That should sound baffling for an object assumed to be 4.5 billion years old.In space, ammonia doesn’t last long – it is easily broken up by ultraviolet light and charged particles from the sun, as well as cosmic rays from elsewhere in the galaxy.“Ammonia is a fragile molecule in a space environment, so the fact that we see it exposed on the surface means that it was put there recently,” says New Horizons team member Dale Cruikshank at NASA’s Ames Research Center in California. “I don’t mean last Thursday, but maybe 100 million years ago.”In context, 100 million years represents only 1/45th the assumed age of the solar system. And there’s a lot of the ammonia present. Unexpected findings like this require auxiliary hypotheses to keep them old. Try as he might, Cruikshank can’t stretch the age out far enough:Because the ammonia is spread over such a large area, it probably emerged in spurting fountains of ice particles as well as by oozing, Cruikshank says. He and his colleagues calculated that this activity must have taken place at most one billion years ago for the ammonia to still be detectable, though it may be more recent.So how and why did it start spurting in the last 1/5th of the assumed age? Quick! Change the subject! “This does not mean that life is present — and we have not yet found it — but it indicates a place where we should look,” another planetary scientist says in an article on Space.com. The paper in Science Advances, however, cannot get 4.5 billion years [4 x 109] out of Pluto.At times when Pluto’s atmosphere is 10% transparent to Lyman-α photons, this flux corresponds to a time scale of ~4 × 105 years [450,000 years], indicating a geologically short lifetime. At times of lower atmospheric transparency, the equivalent lifetime for the ammonia is ~4 × 108 years [400 million years].Ultima ThuleAnother surprising body in the outer solar system is Ultima Thule, the Kuiper Belt object that New Horizons encountered in January two years after its Pluto flyby. Space.com drew attention to “mystery mounds” that the discovery team found. Listen to the sound of scientists gasping when the two lobes of the body were found not to be spherical:“That caught us by surprise,” Stern added. “I think it caught everybody by surprise.”New Horizons imagery also revealed a number of abutting mound-like features on the larger of the two lobes, which mission team members call Ultima. (The smaller lobe, naturally, is Thule.)“They seem to be raised, but exactly what causes them we’re not sure,” Stern said. “It’s still early days.”An early hypothesis held that the mounds resulted from convection of low-temperature ice, which was driven by the heat generated by the radioactive decay of aluminum-26. But further work suggests that this is an unlikely scenario, Stern said. The team now thinks the mounds may be the retained outlines of the small planetesimals that came together to form the Ultima lobe long ago.“But there could be other processes as well,” Stern said. “So, this is an active topic of debate.“NeptuneAnother object showing activity is Triton, Neptune’s largest moon. When Voyager 2 flew by in 1989, scientists were astonished to see evidence of cryovolcanoes and nitrogen geysers. An article on Phys.org tries to explain which gases are likely responsible (N2 and CO), but dodges the question of whether its activity could have been occurring for 4.5 billion years. This article also changes the subject, saying of nitrogen (an inert gas in its diatomic molecular form), “Its abundance in the outer Solar System is an important key to life’s origins, as it is an important part of the building blocks of life.” But the scientists admit Neptune and Triton most likely do not have life. The statement titillates the public with an irrelevant supposition in order to dodge the question of age.SaturnWith Cassini data safely archived on Earth, scientists will be combing through its findings for years or decades. In a recent paper in Geophysical Research Letters, the main findings from Cassini’s last year at Saturn have been summarized. All of them sound too dynamic to last for billions of years.New discoveries examined in this issue include tiny ring particles with complex hydrocarbons streaming into Saturn’s atmosphere, methane from the rings feeding Saturn’s upper atmosphere, electric currents flowing between Saturn and its rings, and a new inner radiation belt. Saturn gravity and magnetic field measurements detected deep winds and differential rotation in its upper layers. Results from Cassini’s final orbits turned out to be more interesting than we could have imagined. Understanding the interior of Saturn and the interplay between the rings and planet will provide insights into how our solar system formed and evolved and the role of gas giant planets in exoplanet systems.Scientists often mask their surprise at false predictions by calling the findings “interesting” while issuing more promissory notes about how the findings will “provide insights” into “evolution” of this or that phenomenon.The SunAren’t we lucky to have a star that spins slowly? That’s uncommon. In fact, the planets have far more of the solar system’s angular momentum than the sun does. That seems backwards. New Scientist describes how lucky Earth was in the sun’s early history:[Prabel] Saxena and his team used data from the Kepler Space Telescope on other sun-like stars to build three models of the young Earth and moon, each with the sun rotating at a different rate. The faster the young sun rotated, the more often it would have experienced flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), blasting huge plumes of plasma into space and battering the inner solar system.They found that for the fast- and even medium-rotating models, there were too many CMEs. Even if the sun rotated just about once every week, there could be tens of CMEs a day, enough to erode away all of the moon’s potassium and much of its sodium – volatile elements that we know still exist there today.In reporter Leah Crane’s headline, “The young sun spun slowly, which could explain why we are here.” Count your lucky stars.Two false assumptions are holding back real science about the solar system: (1) the moyboy mindset, and (2) secularism. Think of how liberating it would be to see our extremely special Earth as a product of intelligent design not that long ago.From a philosophy of science standpoint, there is no obligation for scientists to spin observations into a preferred timeline. Suppose, for instance, each scientist were to just look at processes occurring on a moon—say, the geysers on Triton or Enceladus—and make reasonable upper limits about how long that could have been going on. Why not call that number the maximum age of the moon, and leave it at that? Why all the spin doctoring to force-fit the age into the 4.5 billion years belief?Taking the supposition further, why does the 4.5 billion year age, derived from meteorites, take precedence over everything else? Why couldn’t that age bow to younger ages of other objects? Or, to think even more outside the consensus box, why couldn’t each object in the solar system have its own age?You know the answer. Secular scientists want a comprehensive, materialistic world view from big bang to man. They want galaxies to evolve, stars to evolve, planets to evolve, life to evolve, and human minds to evolve. Everything has to fit that vision, so everything has to evolve in the right order. Plus, Darwin needs those billions of years for life to evolve. It’s irritating to have objects show up out of their spot in the timeline. If Pluto looks too young, it must be artificially aged via storytelling!But what if it is young? Just asking. (Visited 428 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

SA Tourism targets domestic travellers

first_img29 August 2013 South African Tourism has marked the imminent start of Tourism Month with the launch of a new marketing campaign, combined with various affordable holiday packages, aimed at growing the number of domestic travellers in the country. Speaking at the official Tourism Month launch at Amazingwe Lodge in the North West province on Wednesday, Tourism Minister Marthinus Van Schalkwyk said South Africa was an exceptional global destination whose tourist arrivals growth consistently tracked higher than the worldwide average. In 2012, international tourist arrivals to South Africa increased by 10.2% year-on-year, compared to global industry growth of 4%. However, the contribution, and potential for further growth, of domestic tourism were often underestimated. Speaking at a breakfast hosted by the South African Chamber of Commerce and Industry in Johannesburg last week, Van Schalkwyk noted that at any given moment, three-quarters of all tourists in the country were South Africans.Addressing the cost barriers With non-travelling South Africans having indicated that they could not afford to travel or were not aware of accessible offerings, the sector had to work harder to address these information and cost barriers, the minister said. “Through a partnership with the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) we have commissioned a feasibility study for a pilot budget resort chain aimed at an under-served market segment of would-be travellers earning less than R5 000 a month. “We have also commissioned an audit of underused state assets and properties that could be developed into tourist attractions and facilities.” The new domestic marketing campaign – dubbed “Nothing’s More Fun than a Sho’t Left” – also tackles the affordability challenge, while seeking to “bring the fun back to travel”. In a statement on Wednesday, the South African Tourism said the campaign’s television commercials, flighting from the beginning of September, would remind South Africans “that taking a holiday, even for a night or two, gives benefits that endure: great memories, quality time with loved ones, well-deserved escapes from dull routine, and a chance to experience new places, new people and new things”. The campaign also offers a number of holiday package deals designed, in partnership with South African Tourism’s travel partners, to deliver “fun, easy, accessible and affordable holidays”. In his breakfast address earlier this month, Van Schalkwyk said that tourism was a vital contributor to the South African economy, contributing more to gross domestic product (GDP) than, for instance, the automotive industry, and sustaining more direct and indirect jobs than the mining industry. Tourism’s direct contribution to the country’s gross domestic product (GDP) grew to R84-billion in 2011, with the combined direct and indirect contribution making up 9% of GDP, Van Schalkwyk said. At the same time, tourism directly and indirectly sustained 9% of employment in the country, which amounted to one in every 11 jobs.Shifting global patterns On the international front, Van Schalkwyk said that while the UK continued to be South Africa’s biggest overseas tourism market, followed by the US and Germany, China was now the country’s fourth-largest overseas tourism market, up from eighth place two years ago. “In our international market segmentation we recognise that a tectonic shift is under way as economic and political power is moving from the North to the South and from the West to the East.” He said that while the established markets would remain critical for years to come, the changing contours of wealth and power in the world could not be ignored: it was expected that within two years, inbound tourism to emerging market destinations would exceed that of the advanced economies. South African Tourism had invested ahead of return in some of these emerging markets, the minister said, and these were now delivering a much greater share of the industry’s income. In 2012, particularly strong growth was recorded from the Asian market, which saw an increase of 34% in arrivals, and in the Central and South American market, which saw a 37% increase. “We should still do much more to market ourselves as an emerging economy to established markets, but also to other emerging markets, such as China, that are becoming significant tourism spenders.” Referring to global air traffic, Van Schalkwyk pointed out that there was major potential for the development of a South-South corridor that would reflect contemporary trade and other economic realities. “We believe that OR Tambo International Airport in Johannesburg is ideally positioned to be a major hub on such a corridor, for passengers to travel, for example, from South America to India.” SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

Golf: India leap into medal contention

first_imgTop amateur Rashid Khan’s brilliant four-under 68 saw India leap into medal contention in both the men’s individual and team events on Thursday.The 19-year-old Khan, a multiple Faldo Series Asia winner who delayed turning professional to play in the Asian Games, was in top form. After his first-round 71, he was five-under 139.The field was led by 16-year-old Filipino Miguel Luis Tabuena, who shot a second successive four-under to be eight-under 136 and one clear of Kim Men Whee of South Korea.The Indian team, which was way down after the first round, gained ground as Abhijit Chadha made up for his first-day blunder – he submitted a wrong card – with a 71. India moved up to third place, just one shot behind the Philippines.Korea is way ahead 14-under (418), while Phillippines is at three-over (435) and India is four-over (436). The best three scores out of four are counted each day.Abhinav Lohan shot a twounder 70 and was 12th at one-over 145, while Chadha carded a oneunder 71 which will only be counted in the team score.Rahul Bajaj continued to have a poor tournament with 81 and 79 on the two days.Khan started on the back nine and birdied the 10th, 14th and 15th holes to go three-under, before he dropped a shot on the 17th. A birdie on the 18th saw him turn at four-under. He made a bogey on the second but birdies on the fourth and fifth pulled him up again.A bogey on the eighth was quickly compensated with a birdie on nine.advertisementlast_img read more

Police seek other alleged sexassault victims of Balboa Park street performer

first_img Categories: Local San Diego News, Trending FacebookTwitter 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Authorities put out a call today to any other alleged victims of a street performer accused of befriending girls at Balboa Park and then sexually assaulting them.Luis Haaz Martinez, 22, was arrested May 3 on suspicion of six criminal charges, including sexual contact with a person under age 16, according to police.Martinez, who performed as a dancer at the landmark park just north of downtown San Diego, “would approach youthful-appearing females in the area of Balboa Park after performing and convince them to walk with him to isolated areas,” Lt. Carole Beason said.“Once secluded, (Martinez) sexually assaulted his victims,” the lieutenant alleged.The purported crimes occurred last month, according to Beason, who did not disclose the number of alleged victims currently identified in the case. Martinez remains in custody at George Bailey Detention Facility in Otay Mesa in lieu of $200,000 bail.Anyone with information about the suspect’s alleged crimes was asked to call the SDPD Sex Crimes Unit at 619-531-2210. Posted: May 14, 2019 KUSI Newsroom, KUSI Newsroom May 14, 2019 Police seek other alleged sex-assault victims of Balboa Park street performerlast_img read more