Catechists awarded Medal

first_img The University will present the medal to Harrington, Sr. Susanne Gallagher and Fr. James McCarthy at the University Commencement ceremony this May. The medal, established at Notre Dame in 1883, is the oldest and most prestigious honor given to American Catholics. It is awarded annually to a Catholic “whose genius has ennobled the arts and sciences, illustrated the ideals of the Church and enriched the heritage of humanity,” according to a University press release. Harrington said the Laetare Medal will bring much-needed recognition to their organization, which provides religious education for parishioners with intellectual disabilities. “Our work is very hidden because not too many people pay that much attention to people with disabilities,” Harrington said. “The fact that someone thought we were doing a good job just blew us away. … That’s very affirming for us.” McCarthy, a priest in the Archdiocese of Chicago, first conceived the idea for SPRED in 1960 when he read letters from parents expressing their difficulty in finding ministries for their children with intellectual disabilities, Harrington said. He began working on the project in his off time, and in 1963 Harrington joined McCarthy when he requested a member of her congregation, the Society of Helpers, for assistance. “Theology for people with intellectual disabilities was very bleak, you teach them their prayers and that was about it,” Harrington said. “So many had a capacity, but you had to figure out a different way.” The pair began to work with Catechist volunteers to implement a more contemplative and liturgical approach to religious education better suited to people with these disabilities, Harrington said. She said they based the approach off the prior research and practice of French priests from Lyons, France and Quebec, Canada. “We didn’t know how to introduce [the method] to the [United States],” Harrington said. “We started working in rooms with one-way viewing mirrors. The volunteer catechists could observe us working, then do the same thing.” Gallagher, a member of the Sisters of Providence, joined the organization in 1967 to design a Montessori environment for the groups. With the environment, syllabus and observational teaching method in place, SPRED began multiplying its centers across the United States the following year, Harrington said. Today the Chicago SPRED center has trained volunteers for 156 parishes in the Archdiocese of Chicago, 15 other dioceses in the country and parishes in Australia, South Africa, Scotland and other English-speaking nations. “What [the Catechists] are really looking for is the basic mentality or basic attitude toward people with intellectual disabilities that is very respectful but can go outside the box to figure out ways to include them in worship settings,” Harrington said. The SPRED groups in each parish function with six “friends,” or people with disabilities, and six sponsors, the volunteer catechists. Each group has a parish chairperson who is accountable to the parish priest. In this way, Harrington said SPRED is very parish-based and parish-operated. She, McCarthy and Gallagher serve as resource people for the individual groups. Harrington said SPRED also offers continual training at its center, where catechists can continue to observe teaching methods and discuss difficulties they are experiencing. “It’s a very trim, decentralized operation,” Harrington said. “We can keep it moving well and quickly because it is decentralized.” The sponsors at each parish meet once per week, Harrington said. During the first week they prepare a syllabus for the second week, when they put on a two-hour class for their friends. At the third week’s session, the catechists reflect on the previous class and ways they can improve it for the following week, when the friends attend class again. The goal of the sessions is four-fold, Harrington said. The catechists aim to instill within the individuals a sense of the sacred, a sense of Christ, a sense of the Father and a sense of the Spirit as living within the Church. “We’re not working with heavy duty concepts, we’re dealing with much more intuitive and contemplative aspects,” Harrington said. “We use a lot of the arts, like music, gestures, silence, to illustrate points.” To aid parents of the intellectually disabled, Harrington said the volunteers try to educate their children to a level where they are able to participate in a normal worship setting. “Some families are afraid to bring their children to Church because they have been treated disrespectfully there,” she said. “The child is not prepared, and the assembly is not prepared.” SPRED works to overcome that, Harrington said. In addition to preparing the disabled individuals for worship, she said many parishes have installed several liturgies throughout the year that may appeal to those who are intellectually disabled. Although some people have criticized the process as too labor-intensive, Harrington said the method has proven successful. “There’s no other way to do a good job for people with intellectual disabilities,” she said. “Families are very happy. [The individuals] come in as little children, and they’re still with us in their 20s and 30s.” Other critics claim the organization is wasting its time attempting to teach people with disabilities, Harrington said. She said fortunately, not all within the Church view it that way. In a press release, University President Fr. John Jenkins praised SPRED’s commitment to educating people with disabilities. “Insisting that a developmental disability neither tempers Christ’s invitation nor restricts one’s right to respond, they have ushered countless people to their rightful place at the Eucharistic table,” Jenkins said. Being awarded the 2013 Laetare Medal allows SPRED to demonstrate the fruits of its efforts to others, Harrington said. “We see there’s a real person inside, and they really respond,” she said. “Not in a way a regular child would, but in their own way.” The three founders of the Special Religious Education Development Network (SPRED) were shocked to find out they were this year’s recipients of the Laetare Medal, Sr. Mary Therese Harrington said.last_img read more

Growing net zero asset owner group kicks off company engagement

first_imgSource: World Economic Forum/Ciaran McCrickardMembers of the Net Zero Asset Owner Alliance during a press conference at DavosThe Church Commissioners have dedicated more resources to engagement, for example having last year expanded their engagement team with the appointment of two analysts.Günther Thallinger, member of the board of management at Allianz and chair of the Net-Zero Asset Owner Alliance steering group, acknowledged that there was an expectation that money must be shifted, “essentially divesting in some areas and investing in others”, but said this was not the route the alliance would be taking.“We believe we can achieve a much better impact by working with the companies we invest in or the assets we finance,” he said. “If we work with those assets we have a chance of doing value creation and that’s what an investor looks for.”Christina Figueres, convener of Mission 2020 and former Executive Secretary of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, said it was important to understand how complex it was for companies to decarbonise, in particular with respect to the Scope 3 emissions from their supply chain.“We shouldn’t fall into simplistic thinking that once a company or an asset owner assumes a certain target by a certain date they have that under their control,” she said. “Then they need to pull the whole cavalry in to achieve that.“It makes it more complex, but that’s the good news because there are ripple effects that go into the fabric of the economy. It’s both the difficulty as well as the advantage.” Next stepsAccording to Figueres, the Alliance’s engagement with companies had got off to a good start, with “a very clear recognition it needs to be an effort on both sides”.The companies involved were not only “willing to speak but also had an appetite [for the conversation],” she said.Allianz’s Thallinger explained that the asset owner alliance would this year be announcing its first interim decarbonisation target, and that the engagement with companies was “of an essence because the target we will define in 2020 will be supported by measures we are working on with those companies”.“We believe we’re talking about something that is transformational for various areas, not only investing”Günther Thallinger, member of the board of management at Allianz and chair of the Net-Zero Asset Owner Alliance steering group“And that’s why we believe we’re talking about something that is transformational for various areas, not only the investing space.”Thallinger also explained that the Net-Zero Asset Owner Alliance was very keen to expand its membership to cover geographically under-represented areas, in particular Asia, but that it was important to be “honest” and acknowledge the policy and political context in which asset owners from that region operated.The members of the Alliance hoped that other jurisdictions would be more open to encouraging their asset owners to come on board, he said.According to an update from the convenors of the Alliance, the UNEP Finance Initiative and the Principles for Responsible Investment, the group has finalised its governance and objectives for 2020 and will focus on advancing measurement and public reporting and engaging policymakers towards policies supportive of net-zero economy ambitions, in addition to engaging with companies.*Alecta, Allianz, AMF, Aviva, AXA, Caisse des Dépôts (CDC), CalPERS, La Caisse de dépôt et placement du Québec (CDPQ), CNP Assurances, Folksam Group, Fonds de Réserve pour les Retraites (FRR), Nordea Life and Pension, PensionDanmark, Storebrand, Swiss Re, Zurich, now plus Generali and the Church of England’s investment bodies Church Commissioners for England, the Church of England Pensions Board and CBF Church of England Funds The Net Zero Asset Owner Alliance has gained two new members and kicked off its campaign to help achieve the Paris Agreement goals by driving change via engagement with companies.Launched in September, the now 18*-strong group of pension funds and insurers today announced that it had gained new members in the form of the Church of England, with its three national investing bodies, and Italian insurance group Generali.The announcement coincided with the group’s holding its first major engagement event, getting together with more than 50 C-suite representatives of the now $4.3trn (€3.9trn) alliance’s portfolio companies in a closed-door session at the World Economic Forum’s conference in Davos, Switzerland.Speaking at a press conference in Davos, members of the alliance emphasised the importance of engagement, as distinct from investment or divestment, to preventing a global temperature increase above the 1.5°C set out in the Paris Agreement. Tom Joy, chief investment officer at Church Commissioners for England, said: “Yes, capital has to shift into renewable technologies and new opportunities, but the climate crisis will not be solved unless the transition happens.“The climate crisis will not be solved unless the transition happens”Tom Joy, CIO of Church Commissioners for England“Divestment is not the answer to the climate problem. As an asset owner we always retain that right, but it won’t solve the climate crisis.”last_img read more

Commuters React to NYC Grand Jury Chokehold Decision

first_imgBy John BurtonRED BANK – If the New York City grand jury deciding the Eric Garner chokehold death case were made up of a group of commuters at the Red Bank train station the outcome would have clearly been different.A random sampling of a diverse group of those arriving and departing on NJ Transit trains Wednesday evening, following the grand jury decision to not indict NYPD Officer Daniel Pantaleo in the July 17 death of Garner had many of them expressing disappointment, in some cases anger and resignation and even some offering support for the decision.“Racism is alive and well in America,” offered one Asbury Park woman, who declined to give her name, as she waited for the train home.“It was unfair,” that decision to not indict, said Felicia Johnson, Brick. “The video itself showed it was unnecessary. There was no reason to do that,” she continued, referring to the officer’s action to place Garner under arrest resulting in a struggle.“It’s wrong they keep getting away with that,” Johnson continued, meaning police and referencing the shooting of unarmed Ferguson, Missouri, youth Michael Brown by a local police officer and that grand jury’s decision to not indict.Daniel Farley, who works in New York and lives in Metuchen, said he initially wasn’t aware of the grand jury’s decision until he checked his smart phone on the train. “Ferguson was a different ball of wax,” believing there was some question there. “There should have been an indictment here,” he said.Walking to catch the train Farley said there didn’t appear to be any disruption in Manhattan—at least none he was aware of. “I didn’t see anything. I just kept my head down and kept going,” he said. “Like always.”And he didn’t think there would be, at least not to the level that occurred in Ferguson, he added.“I’m sure there won’t be violence,” thought Ethan Ledley.But as Ledley spoke, CNN was reporting that demonstrations were beginning to get underway around New York with participants holding signs with “I Can’t Breathe” written on them.Ledley lives in Brooklyn, New York, and was in Tinton Falls Wednesday on business. “I’d think it’s unfortunate,” but not an entirely unexpected decision, he said. Given this incident and outcome, “There definitely needs to be some changes made with the NYPD” in education and training, Ledley said.In light of the jury’s decision, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio Wednesday called for calm.“You can call for it, it don’t mean you’re going to get it,” responded Danny Corrick, who was waiting to get home to Newark.“There’s no difference between this and Ferguson,” Corrick said. “In both cases somebody died—unnecessarily.”Carlo Rivera, a Red Bank resident returning from Jersey City, saw it differently. “The police have to protect themselves,” he said, adding the grand jury “should give him a break,” referring to Pantaleo. Rivera, however, said “They”—meaning police—“need to learn how to deal with the disabled.”Garner was accused of selling illegal loose cigarettes on a Staten Island street this summer when he was approached by police who attempted to place him under arrest and a scuffle erupted. Police used a chokehold with Garner, who was unarmed and suffered from asthma and diabetes, complaining, “I can’t breath,” and resulting in his death. The incident was captured on video by an onlooker and has been widely broadcast.last_img read more

Goodbye Steamboats, Hello Herons

first_imgMonaghan explainedthe designs went throughmany iterations beforelanding on something thateveryone could agree on. “Herons are just so majestic,” she said. “My other favorite landmark is the train station,” she added and Mery agreed and said it connotes “home.” Monaghan made sure to add details like windowpanes on the train station and the window boxes below that, at the real train station, are always filled by the Little Silver Garden Club with plantings that reflect the season. The heron signs include nautical roping lashed around the top of the sign’s posts and Monaghan said she’s asked that the borough plant seagrass at the base to complete the water way feel. Six of the signs feature the distinctive Little Silver Train Station, a nod to the borough’s busy downtown hub, and two signs feature a white heron soaring over the water, a delightful sight for travelers traveling over the Gooseneck and Oceanport Avenue bridges. By Amy Byrnes At the end of October, new, cheerful “Welcome to Little Silver” signs started popping up around town, reflecting the borough’s history and geography. Silverweb designer and co-owner Nora Monaghan, who’s lived in Little Silver for 23 years, said she especially wanted to highlight Little Silver’s extensive water ways and the stately white birds that she sees whenever she’s driving in and out of the borough. The classic markers had a distinctly colonial vibe and featured illustrations of a steamboat and the year Little Silver was established. center_img Silverweb of Red Bank, a graphic design firm, created the new welcome signs. The firm had helped create a logo and website for recent Little Silver Day celebrations and was happy to work with the borough council members on the design, materials and size of the signs for the $19,000 capital improvement project. “It was really a compliment,” said Silverweb co-owner Jackie Mery. A heron is featured on new signs announcing Little Silver.Photo by Amy Byrnes Once they came up with two designs, the borough went out to four sign fabricators to bid on the project and the winner was Stone Graphics Company, Inc. in Farmingdale. Owner Chris Stone said they applied the same weather resistant paint process used for signs the company created for Walt Disney World in Orlando, Florida that’s durable and – depending on care and environmental conditions – should welcome visitors to Little Silver for years to come. But lately they had started to show their age and were “literally falling apart,” according to Mayor Robert Neff. Public works employees were finding sign parts in the grass. It seemed they were too far gone for fixing. “We thought it was time to bring the signs up to date,” he said. LITTLE SILVER – For decades, iconic carved wooden signs have welcomed people to the riverside borough. “I wanted it to be perfect,” she said.last_img read more

UPDATE: West Kootenay rivals square off in consolation round

first_imgTwo seed from the West Kootenay, L.V. Rogers Bombers, dropped both games in pool play Wednesday.The Bombers lost the opener to host Collingwood 2-0 before Crofton House put a 5-0 beating on LVR in the afternoon contest.LVR concludes the round robin with a game Thursday morning against Windsor.Meanwhile, West Kootenay Champion J. Lloyd Crowe Hawks were also kept of the score sheet in two losses.The Hawks lost 1-0 to Vancouver’s Sentinel before losing the second game of the day 1-0 to St. Michael’s University of Victoria.Crowe meets North Delta Thursday morning.Playoff action goes Thursday afternoon with the seeding games set for Friday morning.The gold medal championship game goes Friday at 3 p.m. West Kootenay rivals J. Lloyd Crowe of Trail and Nelson’s L.V. Rogers Bombers take to the pitch Friday in consolation round action at the B.C. High School AA Girl’s Field Hockey Championships in West Vancouver.The two teams finshed the round robin down in pool play standings.LVR tied North Delta 3-3 while Crowe was shutout by South Okanagan of Oliver 2-0.West Kootenay squads shutout on opening day of Field Hockey tourneyWest Kootenay teams took it on the chin during opening day of the B.C. High School AA Girl’s Field Hockey Championships in West Vancouver.last_img read more

Lyon chief reveals Man United discussions as Liverpool’s Fekir talks end

first_img The biggest market value losers in 2019, including Bale and ex-Liverpool star 2 RANKED Latest transfer news LIVING THE DREAM “I was with Jose Mourinho the other day,” Aulas has been quoted as saying. “We had long discussions.“Personally, I am no longer in discussions with Liverpool.“At the moment, we are waiting for France and Nabil to have a fantastic World Cup.” Top nine Premier League free transfers of the decade Cavani ‘agrees’ to join new club and will complete free transfer next summer 2 Aulas has hinted at interest in Fekir from Manchester United Where every Premier League club needs to strengthen in January TOP WORK Arsenal transfer news LIVE: Ndidi bid, targets named, Ozil is ‘skiving little git’ Fekir’s move to Liverpool collapsed at the 11th hour IN DEMAND Fekir, 24, scored 18 goals and created a further seven in 30 league appearances last season, going on to be included in France’s squad for the World Cup.Les Bleus, managed by Didier Deschamps, finished top of their group and now face a round-of-16 knockout clash against Argentina. Tony Cascarino backs Everton to sign two strikers for Carlo Ancelotti three-way race moving on targets Jean-Michel Aulas has hinted at interest from Manchester United in Liverpool target Nabil Fekir.Fekir, the Lyon playmaker, looked certain to join the Anfield club prior to the World Cup, before the deal collapsed at the final moment. Man United joined by three other clubs in race for Erling Haaland Liverpool’s signings under Michael Edwards – will Minamino be the next big hit? LATEST Chelsea confident of beating Man United and Liverpool to Sancho signing Talks had progressed so far Fekir had already agreed personal terms with the Reds, and had reportedly chosen the shirt number he was going to wear for the Merseyside outfit.However, Lyons announced the deal had been terminated, and the latest reports suggest Fekir could be offered a new contract to stay at the Groupama Stadium.Liverpool remain interested in Fekir and could look to restart talks with the Ligue 1 club after the World Cup, but today Aulas, the Lyons president, has hinted at interest in the France international from Manchester United. Kevin De Bruyne ‘loves Man City and wants to keep winning’, reveals father targets REVEALED last_img read more

West Brom v QPR: Vargas starts

first_imgEduardo Vargas is restored to the QPR starting line-up for the game at West Brom, replacing Junior Hoilett. Frankie Sutherland joins fellow R’s youngster Michael Doughty on the substitutes’ bench.West Brom welcome back Chris Brunt from suspension but defender Craig Dawson is serving a one-match ban. West Brom: Myhill, Baird, McAuley, Lescott, Brunt, Gardner, Fletcher, Morrison, Sessegnon, Berahino, Ideye. Subs: Rose, Wisdom, Pocognoli, Olsson, Yacob, Mulumbu, Anichebe. QPR: Green; Isla, Onuoha, Caulker, Yun, Phillips, Barton, Sandro, Vargas, Austin, Zamora. Subs: McCarthy, Hill, Kranjcar, Henry, Hoilett, Doughty, Sutherland.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img

Spinning Solar System Objects to Keep Them Old

first_imgIf you remove the obligation to think in billions of years, many phenomena in the solar system make more sense.PlutoMore anomalies on Pluto look young. “Pluto is coloured red by ammonia spewing from underneath its surface,” writes Leah Crane for New Scientist. That should sound baffling for an object assumed to be 4.5 billion years old.In space, ammonia doesn’t last long – it is easily broken up by ultraviolet light and charged particles from the sun, as well as cosmic rays from elsewhere in the galaxy.“Ammonia is a fragile molecule in a space environment, so the fact that we see it exposed on the surface means that it was put there recently,” says New Horizons team member Dale Cruikshank at NASA’s Ames Research Center in California. “I don’t mean last Thursday, but maybe 100 million years ago.”In context, 100 million years represents only 1/45th the assumed age of the solar system. And there’s a lot of the ammonia present. Unexpected findings like this require auxiliary hypotheses to keep them old. Try as he might, Cruikshank can’t stretch the age out far enough:Because the ammonia is spread over such a large area, it probably emerged in spurting fountains of ice particles as well as by oozing, Cruikshank says. He and his colleagues calculated that this activity must have taken place at most one billion years ago for the ammonia to still be detectable, though it may be more recent.So how and why did it start spurting in the last 1/5th of the assumed age? Quick! Change the subject! “This does not mean that life is present — and we have not yet found it — but it indicates a place where we should look,” another planetary scientist says in an article on Space.com. The paper in Science Advances, however, cannot get 4.5 billion years [4 x 109] out of Pluto.At times when Pluto’s atmosphere is 10% transparent to Lyman-α photons, this flux corresponds to a time scale of ~4 × 105 years [450,000 years], indicating a geologically short lifetime. At times of lower atmospheric transparency, the equivalent lifetime for the ammonia is ~4 × 108 years [400 million years].Ultima ThuleAnother surprising body in the outer solar system is Ultima Thule, the Kuiper Belt object that New Horizons encountered in January two years after its Pluto flyby. Space.com drew attention to “mystery mounds” that the discovery team found. Listen to the sound of scientists gasping when the two lobes of the body were found not to be spherical:“That caught us by surprise,” Stern added. “I think it caught everybody by surprise.”New Horizons imagery also revealed a number of abutting mound-like features on the larger of the two lobes, which mission team members call Ultima. (The smaller lobe, naturally, is Thule.)“They seem to be raised, but exactly what causes them we’re not sure,” Stern said. “It’s still early days.”An early hypothesis held that the mounds resulted from convection of low-temperature ice, which was driven by the heat generated by the radioactive decay of aluminum-26. But further work suggests that this is an unlikely scenario, Stern said. The team now thinks the mounds may be the retained outlines of the small planetesimals that came together to form the Ultima lobe long ago.“But there could be other processes as well,” Stern said. “So, this is an active topic of debate.“NeptuneAnother object showing activity is Triton, Neptune’s largest moon. When Voyager 2 flew by in 1989, scientists were astonished to see evidence of cryovolcanoes and nitrogen geysers. An article on Phys.org tries to explain which gases are likely responsible (N2 and CO), but dodges the question of whether its activity could have been occurring for 4.5 billion years. This article also changes the subject, saying of nitrogen (an inert gas in its diatomic molecular form), “Its abundance in the outer Solar System is an important key to life’s origins, as it is an important part of the building blocks of life.” But the scientists admit Neptune and Triton most likely do not have life. The statement titillates the public with an irrelevant supposition in order to dodge the question of age.SaturnWith Cassini data safely archived on Earth, scientists will be combing through its findings for years or decades. In a recent paper in Geophysical Research Letters, the main findings from Cassini’s last year at Saturn have been summarized. All of them sound too dynamic to last for billions of years.New discoveries examined in this issue include tiny ring particles with complex hydrocarbons streaming into Saturn’s atmosphere, methane from the rings feeding Saturn’s upper atmosphere, electric currents flowing between Saturn and its rings, and a new inner radiation belt. Saturn gravity and magnetic field measurements detected deep winds and differential rotation in its upper layers. Results from Cassini’s final orbits turned out to be more interesting than we could have imagined. Understanding the interior of Saturn and the interplay between the rings and planet will provide insights into how our solar system formed and evolved and the role of gas giant planets in exoplanet systems.Scientists often mask their surprise at false predictions by calling the findings “interesting” while issuing more promissory notes about how the findings will “provide insights” into “evolution” of this or that phenomenon.The SunAren’t we lucky to have a star that spins slowly? That’s uncommon. In fact, the planets have far more of the solar system’s angular momentum than the sun does. That seems backwards. New Scientist describes how lucky Earth was in the sun’s early history:[Prabel] Saxena and his team used data from the Kepler Space Telescope on other sun-like stars to build three models of the young Earth and moon, each with the sun rotating at a different rate. The faster the young sun rotated, the more often it would have experienced flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), blasting huge plumes of plasma into space and battering the inner solar system.They found that for the fast- and even medium-rotating models, there were too many CMEs. Even if the sun rotated just about once every week, there could be tens of CMEs a day, enough to erode away all of the moon’s potassium and much of its sodium – volatile elements that we know still exist there today.In reporter Leah Crane’s headline, “The young sun spun slowly, which could explain why we are here.” Count your lucky stars.Two false assumptions are holding back real science about the solar system: (1) the moyboy mindset, and (2) secularism. Think of how liberating it would be to see our extremely special Earth as a product of intelligent design not that long ago.From a philosophy of science standpoint, there is no obligation for scientists to spin observations into a preferred timeline. Suppose, for instance, each scientist were to just look at processes occurring on a moon—say, the geysers on Triton or Enceladus—and make reasonable upper limits about how long that could have been going on. Why not call that number the maximum age of the moon, and leave it at that? Why all the spin doctoring to force-fit the age into the 4.5 billion years belief?Taking the supposition further, why does the 4.5 billion year age, derived from meteorites, take precedence over everything else? Why couldn’t that age bow to younger ages of other objects? Or, to think even more outside the consensus box, why couldn’t each object in the solar system have its own age?You know the answer. Secular scientists want a comprehensive, materialistic world view from big bang to man. They want galaxies to evolve, stars to evolve, planets to evolve, life to evolve, and human minds to evolve. Everything has to fit that vision, so everything has to evolve in the right order. Plus, Darwin needs those billions of years for life to evolve. It’s irritating to have objects show up out of their spot in the timeline. If Pluto looks too young, it must be artificially aged via storytelling!But what if it is young? Just asking. (Visited 428 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Fungicide on soybeans a good call in 2018

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Every harvest season can have a valuable lesson or two that a farmer will use to grow an even better crop in future years. According to DuPont Pioneer Account Manager Troy Putnam, the major takeaway after the 2018 growing season, which saw very heavy insect and disease pressure, was that a fungicide application on soybeans was a good move. The Ohio Ag Net’s Ty Higgins has more in this week’s DuPont Pioneer Field Report.last_img

Family alleges starvation death in Jharkhand

first_imgA family in Jharkhand’s Giridih district has alleged that one of its members died of starvation, but State’s Food and Civil Supplies Minister Saryu Roy on Thursday said official reports failed to prove the claim.The Minister said a perfectly laid out protocol to prevent death due to starvation is in place in the State.Ramesh Turi of Chirudih in Giridih district had told the media that his 48-year-old wife Savitri died of starvation on Tuesday last.The Minister said, “there is a perfect protocol to give ration under the Annapurna Yojana to the needy even if they don’t have ration cards, there are grain banks and ₹10,000 is given to Mukhias who can be approached for assistance.last_img