Danny’s Chinese Kitchen in Bellmore Expanding on Long Island

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Danny’s Chinese Kitchen in Bellmore may look like a typical mom-and-pop Chinese takeout, nearly ubiquitous across Long Island, but the reality is quite different. The restaurant, which opened six years ago, is owned by two Jewish brothers from Merrick, Danny and David Antin. “Some people come in and see us behind the counter and they look confused as to whether we’re a real Chinese restaurant,” says David, joking. The origins of Danny’s can be traced back to the Rockaways, where the brothers were raised. As Danny tells it, he started working at a local Chinese restaurant while attending college at Long Island University. The restaurant, East Meets West, happened to be owned by a family friend and retired NYPD detective, Bill Keating. Keating, who still owns East Meets West and has been in the business for 25 years, recalls Danny as a “sweetheart, one of the best.” He explains that Danny started out as a counter person and then learned “the ways of the kitchen, forging strong personal relationships with the chefs and kitchen workers.”Keating helped Danny before he opened Danny’s Chinese Kitchen. Unbeknownst to Danny, his past relationships at East Meets West would prove vital to the new restaurant. Before Danny’s existed, both Danny, 36, and his brother David, 45, were working as accountants. Danny worked for eight years for a large public accounting firm while David had a successful 20-year career in finance. When Danny pondered a career change, David recalled Danny saying he was “never happier” than when he worked at the Chinese takeout place. And David recalled people in his neighborhood lamenting the lack of “good Chinese food” in the area. That helped steer Danny to the restaurant business, and with David as a silent partner, Danny’s opened its first location in 2014. Danny even tapped the former chef at East Meets West, Mr. Lin, to take over kitchen duties, although Danny would continue to help with cooking. As Danny’s got busier, it became evident that he needed help. So, it was natural that David, who was wrapping up his career in finance, would join Danny as a full-time partner in the business in March 2019. But then the pandemic arrived with the new year and threatened to derail the restaurant’s strong growth. Danny’s closed on March 16 for 35 days due to concerns for the staff and customers alike. From January through March, the brothers say their business was down by almost 40 percent because people thought “they could get Covid-19 from eating Chinese food.” “People were scared,” David recalls. He added that they had to work through various fears of people regarding touching surfaces, bags, etc. He says that being entrenched in the community and hiring mostly local employees meant taking precautions seriously, including buying high-quality masks and using enhanced cleaning protocols. When Danny’s reopened in mid-April, David said they had to take matters into their own hands because few workers were available.  “At one point, we were driving a truck to our Hicksville warehouse and getting all of our food supplies since things were so stalled due to Covid-19,” David says, recalling how he smelled like “raw chicken,” on most days. “People were dying for Chinese food…they hadn’t had it for months and we wanted to be there for the community.” But, despite Covid-19, the brothers opened a new location in Massapequa in May of this year, near another former Chinese takeout, Chow Superb Chinese Food.  “We couldn’t get any contractors to come out, so we did much of the work on this spot ourselves, including painting and electrical work,” David notes.  And the brothers’ expansion plans aren’t yet complete, as they are planning an Oceanside location, set to open in 2021. Danny’s varied menu includes more than a few hundred items to choose from, including specialties such as sesame chicken, beef with broccoli, General Tso’s chicken, salmon Hunan style, spare ribs, and special creations, such as pastrami and apple pie egg rolls.  “We’re obsessed with customer service, cleanliness, and quality food that includes getting daily shipments of fresh vegetables, chicken and meat,” David says, explaining what makes Danny’s different.He also adds that their prices are comparable to most other Chinese takeouts. “We’re not reinventing Chinese food,” he says, “but we’re doing it right.” Danny’s Chinese Kitchen is located at 2370 Merrick Rd., Bellmore 516-783-9000 and 20 Broadway, Massapequa 516-809-9970. Visit at dannyschinesekitchen.com.For more food and drink coverage, visit longislandpress.com/category/food-drink Sign up for Long Island Press’ email newsletters here. Sign up for home delivery of Long Island Press here. Sign up for discounts by becoming a Long Island Press community partner here.,Sign up for Long Island Press’ email newsletters here. Sign up for home delivery of Long Island Press here. Sign up for discounts by becoming a Long Island Press community partner here.last_img read more

Susan O’Leary – Alderney – A watching brief

first_imgShare Share Flutter moves to refine merger benefits against 2020 trading realities August 27, 2020 Submit SBC Magazine Issue 10: Kaizen Gaming rebrand and focus for William Hill CEO August 25, 2020 StumbleUpon Related Articles Paddy Power raises awareness of Missing People with Motherwell ‘silhouette’ stand August 7, 2020 Susan O’Leary, AlderneySusan O’Leary, director of eCommerce at Alderney, says the football betting industry needs to embrace regulation to ensure long-term success.The relationship between football betting operators and governments, regulators and advertising watchdogs has, and always will be, a game of tug of war. Operators want to maximise exposure for their brands and offer consumers more markets across more games and leagues than their rivals. The latter, on the other hand, want to keep a watching brief to ensure the integrity of the sport and the betting industry remain intact, with punters protected and prevented from developing unhealthy wagering habits.It’s a difficult balance to strike, and there is still a long way to go until the football betting industry can consider itself stable and sustainable. Just last month, Burnley midfielder Joey Barton was handed an 18-month ban by the FA for breaking rules related to gambling on the sport, placing more than 1,200 wagers (some against his own team losing) over a ten-year period. Barton has in no way been accused of match fixing, but the case shows how high profile, widespread, and ingrained betting on football is.That’s not necessarily a bad thing – betting and sports go hand in hand – but it proves the industry, and those operating in it, need to be closely monitored. Some have put forward the argument for greater self-regulation – members of the Senet Group, which include bookmakers such as William Hill and Paddy Power, have made strides with its When The Fun Stops, Stop campaign – but oversight really must come from independent third parties for it to be truly effective.Football betting operators need to be held accountable to internationally recognised standards; they must be licensed and fully compliant with the rules of the game. That’s as much for their protection as it is for the punters and those at risk of problem play. Operators, governments, regulators and advertising watchdogs must work together, however, to ensure that frameworks and requirements don’t restrict businesses and wrap them round so much red tape they become tangled.By working together, we all benefit from one another’s knowledge and experience. We can learn more about football betting operators, the challenges they face, and how licensing and regulation can help them clear these hurdles. The key is transparency; operators must be open and honest with their players, and educate them on how to play sensibly and within their mental and financial limits. They must also offer help to those whose play becomes cause for concern.Licensing and regulation helps achieve this; it puts various mechanisms in place that stop players exceeding their limits – loss limits, time limits, systems that track patterns of play and raise a flag against those wagering unusually – and ensure the right help is readily available for those who feel they need it. It means operators have a happier, healthier relationship with consumers, providing them with the right environment in which to bet on their favourite football teams, players, matches and leagues.When done properly, regulation doesn’t restrict businesses. It allows them to push the boundaries in a safe and secure environment. For football betting operators, it means they can develop and launch new and exciting products and features, offer more markets on more games and leagues, but in a sensible and sustainable manner.The game of tug of war will continue to take place, but sooner or later we will all meet in the middle.last_img read more