Salmonella, listeria concerns lead to nationwide recall

first_imgWashington D.C. — Envolve Foods, a Corona, Calif. establishment, is recalling approximately 292,764 pounds of ready-to-eat chicken and beef products that contain a vegetable ingredient that may be contaminated with Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.The ready-to-eat chicken and beef items were produced and packaged from Feb. 2, 2017 through Oct. 12, 2018. The following products are subject to recall: [View Labels (PDF only)]• 22-oz. plastic bags containing “simple truth, Chicken Bibimbap” and a case code number of 011110890108 on the label and use by/sell by dates of 11/2/18 through 3/12/20.• 22-oz. plastic bags containing “simple truth, Thai Style Green Curry” and a case code number of 011110816382 on the label and use by/sell by dates of 3/13/19 through 1/24/20.• 22-oz. plastic bags containing “simple truth, Chicken Tikka Masala” and a case code of 011110890092 on the label and use by/sell by dates of 3/22/19 through 4/12/19.10-lb. cases containing “CADENCE GOURMET, Steak Fajitas,” with an item number of SS00024, and an expiration dates of  11/1/2018 through 01/18/19, on the label.• 10-lb. cases containing “CADENCE GOURMET, Tuscan Tomato Basil Chicken & Sausage,” with an item number of SS00032, and an expiration dates of 10/20/18 through 01/09/19 on the label.10-lb. cases containing “CADENCE GOURMET, Rustic Toasted Tomato Basil Chicken & Vegetables,” with an item number of SS00047, and an expiration dates of 2/05/19 through 10/12/19 on the label.The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 44857” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to distribution warehouses nationwide.The problem was discovered on October 16, 2018 when Envolve Foods received notification that the vegetables used in the production of their ready-to-eat products were being recalled by their vegetable supplier due to Salmonellaand Listeria monocytogenes concerns.There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.Consumption of food contaminated with Salmonella can cause salmonellosis, one of the most common bacterial foodborne illnesses. The most common symptoms of salmonellosis are diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever within 12 to 72 hours after eating the contaminated product. The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days. Most people recover without treatment. In some persons, however, the diarrhea may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized.Consumption of food contaminated with L. monocytogenes can cause listeriosis, a serious infection that primarily affects older adults, persons with weakened immune systems, and pregnant women and their newborns. Less commonly, persons outside these risk groups are affected.Listeriosis can cause fever, muscle aches, headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance and convulsions sometimes preceded by diarrhea or other gastrointestinal symptoms. An invasive infection spreads beyond the gastrointestinal tract. In pregnant women, the infection can cause miscarriages, stillbirths, premature delivery or life-threatening infection of the newborn. In addition, serious and sometimes fatal infections in older adults and persons with weakened immune systems. Listeriosis is treated with antibiotics. Persons in the higher-risk categories who experience flu-like symptoms within two months after eating contaminated food should seek medical care and tell the health care provider about eating the contaminated food.FSIS is concerned that some product may be frozen and in consumers’ freezers. Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.last_img read more

Great Olympics release 14 players in massive reshuffle

first_imgAccra Great Olympics have released 14 players from their team in a massive shakedown of the squad.The news was confirmed to Citi Sports on Tuesday by sources close to the club.Although no reason was given by the source, it is very likely that Olympics have taken such a move to improve the playing body ahead of a resumption of the league when the pandemic blows over.While nothing official has been said concerning the identities of the players, some reports have gone ahead to state that the likes of Emmanuel Clottey, Ollenu Ashitey, Godfred Saka and Ernest Sowah are part of the those exiting the club.Great Olympics head coach, Annor Walker, stated after their Week 12 loss to Medeama Sporting Club that he had plans of improving the team but those plans would be for the 2020/ 2021 Ghana Premier League season.“My plan is to make this team stand on its feet. So, I want to have a good blend of youth and experience in order to create a better unit for next season.”At the time of the league’s suspension due to the Coronavirus pandemic, the “Dade” Boys had not experienced a very good run in the first round of the Ghana Premier League.Olympics were 10th on the league log with 20 points from the 15 matches played. They had recorded 6 wins, 7 losses and 2 draws. They scored 17 goals and gave away 19.last_img read more

Vancouver to look into limited fee holidays

first_imgDeveloper Dave White wants to build Mountain Terrace — a $10 million development featuring 130 townhouses, a gymnasium and a day care — on his property along Northeast 162nd Avenue.But banks are “cherry-picking” only the best projects for lending, and with $1 million in city permitting and other fees before he hammers a nail, White said he and other developers could use a city fee holiday.“We’d just like any help we can get to make this pencil so banks find it attractive,” said White, who lobbied to have the property annexed into the city in 2006. “This is the difference of building and not building.”However, it’s not clear how inclined the Vancouver City Council — which would make the final call on any temporary or permanent fee holidays — is to giving public subsidies to builders.In a Monday workshop, city staff outlined how a fee holiday process could work in Vancouver, but said they believed it is too complicated and too costly to pan out. The Community Development Department relies almost entirely on permit and other fees. When a government puts in a fee holiday, staff explained, the money has to be covered by the city’s already strained budget.last_img read more