SUB consults students, anticipates spring

first_imgSenior Kaitlyn Keelin, executive director of the Student Union Board (SUB), said the group strongly emphasized consulting students to determine the organization’s offerings this semester. “We’ve been focusing on getting more student input and collecting a lot of data so that we can plan events that students want to see on campus,” Keelin said. SUB’s most-attended event of the semester was Comedy on the Quad, in which comedian Jim Gaffigan drew approximately 4,000 students to his performance on South Quad, Keelin said. She said other popular SUB events included a presentation by “Breaking Bad” star R.J. Mitte, a Legends stand-up comedy performance by SNL’s Nasim Pedrad and a Legends concert featuring Eric Hutchinson. Keelin said SUB’s biggest challenge was a lack of participation in the Purdue Ticket Lottery. She said SUB purchased the tickets from the Athletic Department at face value last spring, so they lost out when reduced-price tickets became widely available from other sources, such as StubHub. The final SUB event of the semester, Stress Relievers, will take place Sunday from 6 to 8 p.m. in the Notre Dame Room and the ballroom of the LaFortune Student Center, Keelin said. The event will feature free food, energy drinks and massages, she said. Keelin said the spring semester will feature several large-scale events, including the Collegiate Jazz Festival, the Notre Dame Literary Festival, the Holy Half, The SUB Concert and AnTostal week.  Next semester, SUB will also distribute frequent moviegoer passes that enable students who regularly attend SUB movies to earn free admission, Keelin said.  Keelin said the spring’s kick-off event will be a fireside talk and a networking reception with Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian. Grade: B+ SUB brought some interesting acts to campus so far, but the money they lost in the Purdue Ticket Lottery may affect next semester’s programming. Contact Christian Myers at cmyers8@nd.edulast_img read more

Wendy’s CEO lectures on brand relevance

first_imgThe Wendy’s Company President and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Emil Brolick spoke Friday in the first installment of the annual “Boardroom Insights” lecture series sponsored by the Mendoza College of Business.With nearly three decades of experience, Brolick has done work that includes marketing, brand leadership and product development in companies such as Yum, A&W, Long John Silver’s, Taco Bell and The Wendy’s Company. His lecture Friday explored the idea of “brand relevance” and ways in which the actions of brand leaders affect a brand’s ability to obtain and maintain relevance in a changing world.Consumers are exposed to thousands of brands, Brolick said. There often is a stark dichotomy between well-positioned and poorly positioned brands. In order for a brand to qualify as well positioned, Brolick said it must have particular characteristics.“First of all, it ought to be unique,” he said. “Secondly, it ought to be defensible from the competition, and thirdly, it ought to be profitable.”Brolick said brand leaders should act conscientiously in positioning their brand by considering the effects of everything they do and by striving to create and uphold a good brand name.“One of the things you are going to want to think about as an individual is, is your brand something that is being actively positioned and thought about in a very constructive and authentic kind of way, or are you kind of being positioned by default?” Brolick said.To illustrate the difference between well-positioned brands and brands positioned by default, Brolick discussed the personal brands of Warren Buffett, Barack Obama, Lou Holtz, Steve Jobs and Brian Kelly. While Warren Buffett conscientiously formed his personal brand, Brolick said Steve Jobs likely was positioned by default, as evidenced by his reputed aggressive personality.Once a company or individual commits to a focus on brand relevance, Brolick said they must keep themselves open to change and adaptation and avoid the “tyranny of incrementalism.” Brand leaders must be willing to set new and different goals for themselves, Brolick said.“Change is inevitable,” he said. “There is no doubt. And today, it is going faster and faster, but you have to somehow figure out how to change, how to evolve, how to grow, but still be grounded and be the same person. Brands have to do this all the time.”Although Blockbuster failed to adapt to the changes that occurred when Netflix started up, Brolick said the Disney brand has changed tremendously since the creation of Disneyland. ABC News, Marvel Comics, Touchstone pictures, Disney Cruiselines and Pixar are evidence of the growth of Disney as a brand, he said.“Did [the Disney] brand change, or did the leadership in the people behind this brand change?” he said. “… This is a key thing: People are the difference in organizations.”Brolick said he credits the people within organization as the ultimate source of differentiation between brands. The “journey of growth” for brands and individuals depends on the personal experiences, personal education and personal observations of brand leaders, Brolick said. The power or weakness of a brand depends on individuals’ abilities to take advantage of these three steps in their journey.“Have as many fabulous experiences as you can in your life and your career,” he said. “All the time when someone says ‘Emil, we’re thinking about this for you,’ I say ‘I am in.’ It is a new experience; I can get excited about this; I want to do this; I want to demonstrate that I can make a difference. I am in.”Brolick closed the lecture with a Michelangelo quote: “The greater danger for most of us lies not in setting our aim too high and falling short, but in setting our aim too low and achieving our mark.”“We are all very fortunate to have been somehow part of a university like this,” he said. “And I truly believe that God expects the most from those that he has given the most, and He has given all of us an awful lot.”Tags: Boardroom Insights, brands, Emil Brolick, leaders, Mendoza, The Wendy’s Companylast_img read more