Ian Wright reveals the chat which kick-started Dennis Bergkamp’s Arsenal career

first_imgDennis Bergkamp had to get used to the physicality of the English game (Picture: Getty Images)Dennis Bergkamp struggled with the physicality of the English game when he moved to Arsenal and Ian Wright says he had to tell him to start ‘leaving a bit’ on opposition players.The Dutchman arrived at Arsenal in the summer of 1995 for a then club record transfer fee of £7.5m but had a slow start to life in north London.Wright says this was due to the physical nature of the Premier League at the time and Bergkamp not being used to it after his career in Holland and Italy to that point.After another failure in a cup game against Hartlepool, Wright felt like he had to step in and teach Bergkamp how to deal with the aggression of English defenders.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENT‘I remember when he started he went about eight or nine games where it wasn’t going well for him, people were bullying him, he was kicked and went down pretty easily,’ Wright told the BBC. Comment Advertisement Phil HaighThursday 16 Apr 2020 8:54 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link181Shares Bergkamp and Wright enjoyed great success at Arsenal (Picture: Getty Images)‘We played a game against Hartlepool, it was the game before Southampton (when he scored his first two goals) the press did a massive piece on how poor he was, how he couldn’t score past a second string goalkeeper and I remember a few games before that I said to him: “Dennis, you’re going to have to start leaving a bit and letting people know you’re there.”‘He was 6ft 2in he was wiry he could put himself about, he could look out for himself. I told him you can’t leave yourself so open, you’ve got to leave something and let people know you’re not going to be kicked every single day. ‘Dennis was cute, he was cute the way he’d leave his foot in.’More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityBergkamp would go on to play 11 seasons with the Gunners, winning three Premier League titles and four FA Cups, scoring 120 goals for the club.Wright says the Dutchman was the catalyst to all the success achieved under Arsene Wenger and believes he is even the greatest signing in the club’s history.‘All the success we had was built upon what Dennis Bergkamp brought to us as a football player. Absolutely magnificent for our club,’ Wright continued.‘The best signing we’ve ever made in respect of the way it changed the DNA of Arsenal football club.’MORE: Arsenal’s Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang a ‘great priority’ for Real Madrid this summerMORE: Ian Wright explains why Dennis Bergkamp is Arsenal’s greatest ever signingFollow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.For more stories like this, check our sport page. Ian Wright reveals the chat which kick-started Dennis Bergkamp’s Arsenal career Advertisementlast_img read more

Northern California schools to host the Women of Troy

first_imgThe Women of Troy end the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation conference portion of their schedule this weekend as they travel to the Bay Area for two crucial road matches against No. 8 San Jose State (14-9, 2-4) and No. 2 Stanford (18-1, 4-0).Road trippin’ · USC is ranked No. 3 in the country and will take its six-game winning streak up north to San Jose State and Stanford. – Chris Pham | Daily TrojanA sweep on the team’s trip north could put No. 3 USC (17-3, 4-1) in position for a first-place finish in the MPSF as USC tries to extend its six-game winning streak.The weekend starts Friday at 1 p.m. with a clash against San Jose State, which has won seven of its last nine matches.In their season opener, the Women of Troy claimed a 14-6 victory over the Spartans at the Stanford Invitational to extend their all-time record against them to 24-0.The Spartans are led by attacker Dani Curran and utility player Anna Natalizio, who have combined for 88 goals as San Jose’s top scorers.The marquee matchup of the weekend goes down Saturday at 1 p.m., when the Women of Troy travel to Palo Alto to play the No. 2 Cardinal.The two squads matched up earlier this season at the Stanford Invitational on Feb. 4, when the Cardinal eked out an 8-7 win over USC.Stanford’s only loss of the season came in a 5-4 nail-biter to No. 1 UCLA at the UCI Invitational in late February. Since then, Stanford has reeled off seven wins in a row by an average of 9.7 goals.Goalkeeper Kate Baldoni is a force in the cage for Stanford, averaging 9.7 saves per game while allowing only 4.5 goals per game.The Cardinal has a pair of freshman for leading scorers in driver Kiley Neushul with 42 goals and two-meter Ashley Grossman with 37 goals.USC is 24-24 all-time against Stanford and has lost the last five matches in the rivalry, including an 8-4 defeat in the NCAA semifinals last year.Both matches tip off at 1 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and after this weekend, the Women of Troy get a two-week break before wrapping up the regular season against CSU Bakersfield on April 20.last_img read more

Geneedited foods are safe Japanese panel concludes

first_img Now, Japan appears set to follow the U.S. example. The final report, approved yesterday, was not immediately available, but an earlier draft was posted on the ministry website. The report says no safety screening should be required provided the techniques used do not leave foreign genes or parts of genes in the target organism. In light of that objective, the panel concluded it would be reasonable to require information on the editing technique, the genes targeted for modification, and other details from developers or users that would be made public while respecting proprietary information.The recommendations leave open the possibility of requiring safety evaluations if there are insufficient details on the editing technique. The draft report does not directly tackle the issue of whether such foods should be labeled. The ministry is expected to largely follow the recommendations in finalizing a policy on gene-edited foods later this year.Consumer groups had voiced opposition to the draft recommendations, which were released for public comment in December 2018. Using the slogan “No need for genetically modified food!” the Consumers Union of Japan joined other groups circulating a petition calling for regulating the cultivation of all gene-edited crops, and safety reviews and labeling of all gene-edited foods.Whether consumers will embrace the new technology remains to be seen. Japan has approved the sale of genetically modified (GM) foods that have passed safety tests as long as they are labeled. But public wariness has limited consumption and has led most Japanese farmers to shun GM crops. The country does import sizable volumes of GM processed food and livestock feed, however. Japanese researchers are reportedly working on gene-edited potatoes, tomatoes, rice, chicken, and fish. “Thorough explanations [of the new technologies] are needed to ease public concerns,” Sone said.*Correction, 22 March, 3:25 p.m.: This story has been updated to note that the U.S. Department of Agriculture, not the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, decided not to regulate gene-edited foods. Email Japan will allow gene-edited foodstuffs to be sold to consumers without safety evaluations as long as the techniques involved meet certain criteria, if recommendations agreed on by an advisory panel yesterday are adopted by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. This would open the door to using CRISPR and other techniques on plants and animals intended for human consumption in the country.“There is little difference between traditional breeding methods and gene editing in terms of safety,” Hirohito Sone, an endocrinologist at Niigata University who chaired the expert panel, told NHK, Japan’s national public broadcaster.How to regulate gene-edited food is a hotly debated issue internationally. Scientists and regulators have recognized a difference between genetic modification, which typically involves transferring a gene from one organism to another, and gene editing, in which certain genes within an organism are disabled or altered using new techniques such as CRISPR. That’s why a year ago, the U.S.Department of Agriculture concluded that most gene-edited foods would not need regulation. But the European Union’s Court of Justice ruled in July 2018 that gene-edited crops must go through the same lengthy approval process as traditional transgenic plants.  In Japan, genetically modified products have to be labeled; an advisory panel did not say whether that should apply to gene-edited food as well. 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Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Shiho Fukada/Bloomberg/Getty Images Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Gene-edited foods are safe, Japanese panel concludeslast_img read more