Kroc Institute fellow discusses Arab Spring research

first_imgWill Moore, a visiting research fellow at the Kroc Institute and Florida State University professor of political science, addressed the shortcomings of popular perspectives on the events of the Arab Spring. He revisited the dissent and revolutions in the Middle East on Tuesday during the lecture “Dissent, Repression and Outcomes of the Arab Spring.” “Conventional Arab Spring narratives are unpersuasive because they don’t focus on outcomes,” he said. “These narratives also have a very strong ‘blame the victim’ approach, which is ahistorical.” Moore said there should be a focus on the behavior and interactions of dissidents and states. He discussed 24 instances of mass protests in four different countries — Algeria, Egypt, Jordan and Syria — since 1990 and said it was significant that only one of those protests resulted in a victory for the dissidents. “Unless you start paying attention to the interaction of states and dissidents, you can’t understand the outcomes,” he said. Moore outlined the research methodology and theoretical approach for his current project, which will supply the content for an eventual book on the subject. “I don’t yet have the answers to the questions I’m addressing. I’m going to be laying out how I’ve designed a research project,” he said. Eventually, the project will include case studies for every country in the entire Middle East and North Africa, as well as further analyses for the period of 1990 to 2011, Moore said. Currently, he is focused on 10 countries in particular and only has access to data from 1990 to 2004. “During this time and in all of these countries, dissidents and states are interacting. In every single one of these 10 nations, there is a long history of people challenging government and government responding in kind,” Moore said. During the lecture, Moore displayed a graph of dissident and state activity in each of the 10 countries and pointed out that some, such as Tunisia, stood out as having less dissident activity. The data came from a database of news reports, he said. “Something I have to consider is whether there is less news coverage or actually less dissident activity,” he said. Moore said he intends to evaluate the behavior of two actors, the state and the dissidents, along a Hostility-Cooperation Continuum. He said the continuum shows how one side responds to the behavior of the other and how both the desire to stay in power and the influence of constituents are important in determining this behavior. “If you’re halfway up the hostility scale, my people want me slightly … more hostile than you,” Moore said. Moore said the continuum allows him to estimate the average behavior when the other actor does nothing. For example, the state will be very cooperative on average when the dissidents do nothing. He said he can also estimate the average responsiveness to surprise for each actor, though his calculations do not differentiate between hostile and cooperative responses to surprises. Moore said his current data reveals interesting patterns, but he has not analyzed the set thoroughly enough to draw any conclusions. “I haven’t delved into how much I can trust these particular estimates,” he said. “I’m showing you a flavor of what I’m going to be able to do,” Moore said his project might not lead to the kind of results he hopes for, but he believes it addresses something existing literature is missing. “Does this project that I’ve launched give me any leverage? It’s possible I’ll strike out,” he said. “I’ve argued existing scholarship ignores behavior and limits our ability to understand and answer important questions. The missing objective of inquiry is the behavior of dissidents and states.”last_img read more

Salmonella, listeria concerns lead to nationwide recall

first_imgWashington D.C. — Envolve Foods, a Corona, Calif. establishment, is recalling approximately 292,764 pounds of ready-to-eat chicken and beef products that contain a vegetable ingredient that may be contaminated with Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.The ready-to-eat chicken and beef items were produced and packaged from Feb. 2, 2017 through Oct. 12, 2018. The following products are subject to recall: [View Labels (PDF only)]• 22-oz. plastic bags containing “simple truth, Chicken Bibimbap” and a case code number of 011110890108 on the label and use by/sell by dates of 11/2/18 through 3/12/20.• 22-oz. plastic bags containing “simple truth, Thai Style Green Curry” and a case code number of 011110816382 on the label and use by/sell by dates of 3/13/19 through 1/24/20.• 22-oz. plastic bags containing “simple truth, Chicken Tikka Masala” and a case code of 011110890092 on the label and use by/sell by dates of 3/22/19 through 4/12/19.10-lb. cases containing “CADENCE GOURMET, Steak Fajitas,” with an item number of SS00024, and an expiration dates of  11/1/2018 through 01/18/19, on the label.• 10-lb. cases containing “CADENCE GOURMET, Tuscan Tomato Basil Chicken & Sausage,” with an item number of SS00032, and an expiration dates of 10/20/18 through 01/09/19 on the label.10-lb. cases containing “CADENCE GOURMET, Rustic Toasted Tomato Basil Chicken & Vegetables,” with an item number of SS00047, and an expiration dates of 2/05/19 through 10/12/19 on the label.The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 44857” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to distribution warehouses nationwide.The problem was discovered on October 16, 2018 when Envolve Foods received notification that the vegetables used in the production of their ready-to-eat products were being recalled by their vegetable supplier due to Salmonellaand Listeria monocytogenes concerns.There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.Consumption of food contaminated with Salmonella can cause salmonellosis, one of the most common bacterial foodborne illnesses. The most common symptoms of salmonellosis are diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever within 12 to 72 hours after eating the contaminated product. The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days. Most people recover without treatment. In some persons, however, the diarrhea may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized.Consumption of food contaminated with L. monocytogenes can cause listeriosis, a serious infection that primarily affects older adults, persons with weakened immune systems, and pregnant women and their newborns. Less commonly, persons outside these risk groups are affected.Listeriosis can cause fever, muscle aches, headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance and convulsions sometimes preceded by diarrhea or other gastrointestinal symptoms. An invasive infection spreads beyond the gastrointestinal tract. In pregnant women, the infection can cause miscarriages, stillbirths, premature delivery or life-threatening infection of the newborn. In addition, serious and sometimes fatal infections in older adults and persons with weakened immune systems. Listeriosis is treated with antibiotics. Persons in the higher-risk categories who experience flu-like symptoms within two months after eating contaminated food should seek medical care and tell the health care provider about eating the contaminated food.FSIS is concerned that some product may be frozen and in consumers’ freezers. Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.last_img read more