1st Source Bank to replace NDFCU in LaFortune

first_imgOn-campus banking options are set to look different for students and staff next year, with changes in the LaFortune Student Center and ATMs around campus.A branch of 1st Source Bank will replace the Notre Dame Federal Credit Union (NDFCU) branch currently housed in LaFortune. An announcement of the change was sent to all students and staff via email Thursday.Sophomore Drew Carmona, the student government representative on the evaluation committee responsible for the decision, said the University chose 1st Source from an initial pool of 13 financial institutions.“We put a lot of thought into what was best for the University and what was best for our students and staff,” Carmona said. “We selected 1st Source as the new campus branch bank partner because 1st Source has the ability to offer flexible solutions that best meet our unique needs.“We wanted a financial institution that could meet the needs of the University’s cashiering services, as well as offer quality services and consumer banking.”Carmona said, as the new partner bank, 1st Source will take over several duties formerly performed by NDFCU.“1st Source is going to administer various functions, like student account payments, department deposits, event/start-up cash and cashing checks,” he said.The transition likely will be completed over the summer, Carmona said. The new 1st Source branch will open July 1, and there will also be several 1st Source ATMs around campus.Carmona said students are free to do their personal banking with any financial institution. He said the main office of NDFCU on Moreau Drive will remain open and there will still be several NDFCU ATMs around campus to serve those who have accounts with NDFCU.“If anyone has an account with NDFCU, they can keep it. They can still bank with them,” Carmona said.Carmona said the evaluation committee also reviewed results from a student-banking survey conducted in the fall and found most students do their banking with large, national banks. The University plans to add ATMs for some of these banks, in addition to the other campus banking changes.“We’re looking into expanding our ATM offerings to fulfill the needs of as many students and employees as possible.” Carmona said. “We are reaching out to a few national banks to see if they would be willing to place an ATM on campus to service consumers who already have accounts with them, to help minimize bank fees — such as ATM withdrawal fees. That’s something very important to our students.”The process behind these decisions began in October 2013 with the formation of the evaluation committee, led by Procurement Services and composed of representatives from Treasury Services, the Controller’s Office, Human Resources, the Student Activities Office and student government.After establishing the committee, members sent a request for proposal to 13 banking institutions, Carmona said. The committee used the proposals to narrow the group down to a few finalists and heard a presentation from each of them in January.Tags: Bankinglast_img read more

4 persons arrested for ‘illegal gambling’

first_imgThe suspects were detained in thelockup cell of Police Station 1./PN Bacolod City – Four persons were nabbed for alleged illegal gamblingin Barangay 16. Residents Jun Jun Arcenas, RogieFlores, Lito Alegayd, and John Clifford Perocho were caught in the act playing tumbo on Dec. 10, a police reportshowed. center_img Recovered from their possession wasbet money which amounted to P115.  last_img

Sharapova knocked out of US Open by Sevastova

first_imgMARIA Sharapova’s first Grand Slam tournament in 19 months ended with defeat by Anastasija Sevastova in the US Open fourth round.Latvia’s Sevastova, the 16th seed, won 5-7 6-4 6-2 to reach the quarter-finals in New York.The 27-year-old will play Sloane Stephens in the quarter-finals, after the American beat Julia Goerges.Sharapova, ranked 146th after returning from a doping ban in April, was given a wildcard into the main draw.The 2006 champion had played just one match since May coming into Flushing Meadows, with injuries forcing her out of the grass-court season and US Open build-up.She played superbly to upset world number two Simona Halep on the first day of the tournament, and then beat Timea Babos and Sofia Kenin on her way to the last 16.Sevastova proved too strong, however, the 5ft 5in Latvian’s defensive skills and ability to create angles ultimately derailing the Russian.“The first set was very close, it could have gone either way,” said Sevastova.“She played unbelievable throughout the first and second set and I just kept fighting, running every ball, and just stayed there.”Sharapova ended the match with 51 errors to 42 winners as she pressed too hard in trying to break down Sevastova’s brilliant defence.The Latvian went close to taking the first set after coming back from 4-1 down, but Sharapova clinched it with two magnificent forehands in game 12.The momentum had already begun to swing though, and Sevastova would level thanks to a single break at 2-1 in the second – in one rally lobbing Sharapova twice, prompting the Russian to scramble left-handed in desperation.A six-minute bathroom break ahead of the decider apparently did not have the desired effect as Sharapova quickly fell 3-0 down.She had said after her opening match that “this girl has a lot of grit”, and it was in evidence as she cut the deficit to 3-2, but in the end Sevastova had too much.Sharapova fought off three match points before a big first serve left the five-time major winner flailing at a return that flew wide after two hours and 17 minutes.(BBC Sport)last_img read more

‘Russia State-sponsored Doping across Majority of Olympic Sports’

first_imgRussia operated a state-sponsored doping programme for four years across the “vast majority” of summer and winter Olympic sports, claims a new report.It was “planned and operated” from late 2011 – including the build-up to London 2012 – and continued through the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics until August 2015.An investigation commissioned by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) says Russia’s sports ministry “directed, controlled and oversaw” manipulation of urine samples provided by its athletes. It says Russian athletes benefited from what the report called the “Disappearing Positive Methodology”, whereby positive doping samples would go missing.International Olympic Committee (IOC) President Thomas Bach described the commission’s findings as a “shocking and unprecedented attack on the integrity of sport and on the Olympic Games” and pledged to enforce the “toughest sanctions available” against those implicated.The IOC will decide on Tuesday about any “provisional measures and sanctions” for the Rio Olympics, which start on August 5.The commission, led by Canadian law professor and sports lawyer Dr Richard McLaren, looked into allegations made by the former head of Russia’s national anti-doping laboratory.Grigory Rodchenkov claimed he doped dozens of athletes before the 2014 Winter Olympics, which were held in Sochi, Russia.Rodchenkov – described by the Kremlin as a “scandalous” former official – also alleged he had been helped by the Russian secret service, the FSB.He claimed they had worked out how to open and reseal supposedly tamper-proof bottles that were used for storing urine samples so the contents could be replaced with “clean” urine.McLaren sent a random amount of stored samples from “protected Russian athletes” at Sochi 2014 to an anti-doping laboratory in London to see if they had scratch marks around the necks of the bottles that would indicate they had been manipulated.McLaren said “100% of the bottles had been scratched” but added that would “not have been visible to the untrained eye”.He said he had “unwavering confidence” in all of his findings.The damning report does not make any recommendations, but will fuel calls for a complete ban on Russia from the 2016 Summer Olympics, which start in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on August 5.Wada has recommended the IOC “decline entries, for Rio 2016, of all athletes” submitted by the Russian Olympic Committee and the Russian Paralympic Committee. Russian government officials should also be banned from this summer’s Games, it said.WADA President, Sir Craig Reedie, called the “scope and scale” of the findings a “real horror story”, adding that he was “encouraged” the “correct decision” would be taken by the IOC.“I’m not sure that the system is broken,” Reedie told BBC Radio 5 live. “But if you are determined to cheat you can get round the system. We can’t sit back on the situation; we have to work with Russian officials to change the culture in that country.”President Vladimir Putin made the Sochi Games a showcase event and spent more than $50bn (£37.7bn) staging the Games.On Monday, Putin said officials named in the McLaren report would be suspended, pending a thorough investigation.But a statement released by the Kremlin criticised the report as “accusations against Russian athletes” based on the testimony of “a person with a scandalous reputation”.It also warned of a “dangerous recurrence of interference of politics in sport”.Putin has asked WADA to provide “more complete, objective, evidence-based information” to Russian investigators.The report said Russia’s ‘Disappearing Positive Methodology’ worked when analysis could be done at the Moscow laboratory.But at an international event – such as London 2012, the Athletics World Championships of 2013, or the Swimming World Championships of 2015 – Russia had to adapt its methods.The report found:Dr Rodchenkov’s “cocktail” of steroids was given to athletes prior to London 2012. They were drugs he felt were least likely to be detectedForty six Russian athletes with performance-enhancing drugs in their system were pre-tested from 17-22 July 2012They were categorised as red – will test positive and should be replaced; amber – traces of drugs, but should be clear for London; green – cleanAll records of positive tests were falsified into negative resultsAthletes were also given micro-doses of blood-booster erythropoietin (EPO) up until two weeks before they left for LondonEleven of the 46 athletes won medals at London 2012 – some have since been banned and had their medals strippedIn June 2016, the IOC ordered retests of London 2012 samples – eight athletes tested positiveIt was “inconceivable” that Russia’s Sports Minister, Vitaly Mutko, was not aware of the doping cover-up scheme, according to the report.Mutko has been in position since 2008. He is a member of the executive committee of football’s world governing body, FIFA, and chairs the organising committee of the 2018 World Cup, to be held in Russia.The report claimed Mutko personally intervened to cover up a doping case of “at least” one overseas football player in the Russian League and that 11 positive tests by Russia footballers disappeared.However, it was Mutko’s deputy, Yuri Nagornykh, who was advised of “every positive analytical finding” from the Moscow laboratory from 2011 onwards – in “total violation” of WADA rules – and decided who to protect.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more