Professor lectures on Latinos

first_imgDr. David Hayes-Bautista, director of the Center for the Study of Latino Health and Culture at the University of California Los Angeles, addressed the implications of the United States’ increasing Latino population Monday in McKenna Hall.   In a lecture titled “Young Latinidad and the Future of America,” Hayes-Bautista said the growing percentage of Latinos in the United States is inevitable and beneficial. “In Texas and in California and in New Mexico, over 50 percent of the babies born are Latino,” he said. “This is the norm.”   Latinos are also a sizable minority in other states, such as Illinois and New York, Hayes-Bautista said. “As a whole, the state will work more, work more hours per week, use less welfare, have fewer heart attacks, have fewer cancers, have fewer strokes [as the Latino population grows],” he said. Hayes-Bautista said his research shows these statistical shifts are largely due to cultural differences between Latinos and other Americans. “Latinos have the highest labor force participation of any group in the country and are far more likely to start a business,” he said. “Latinos have historically very low welfare utilization rates.” Despite their potential positive impact on the United States, the media portrays Latinos mostly negatively, Hayes-Bautista said. “If you go home and watch the 11 o’clock news, what’s it likely to be?,” Hayes-Bautista said. “Gangs, illegal immigration, teenage moms.” This portrayal differs largely from present Latino realities and history, Hayes-Bautista said. North America contained early Latino settlements whose people participated in past wars and helped finance the American Revolution, he said.    “Because of Latinos, because of the values,  because of the families, because of the faith, we have always been building this country since 80 years before [the settlement of Jamestown, Va.],” he said. “Latinos have been helping to defend the freedoms of this country since 1776.” November’s elections clearly indicate present-day Latinos will have a similarly-profound impact on the United States, Hayes-Bautista said. “The Latino electorate stepped forward and changed the course of this nation’s history by causing the re-election of President Obama,” he said. “Not because of President Obama, but because Latinos made the difference.”last_img read more

CDC says 3.4 million doses of H1N1 vaccine to ship in early October

first_imgSep 18, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – The first wave of H1N1 vaccine will probably consist of 3.4 million doses of MedImmune’s nasal-spray product and is likely to reach providers the first week in October, federal health officials said today.At the same time, officials said the pandemic virus is now circulating widely in 21 states, 10 more than a week ago, and the number of patients going to clinics and hospitals with flu-like illness is about twice what is normal for this time of year.Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said on Sep 13 that the first doses of vaccine could become available the first week in October, but today marked the first time officials gave a specific number. Previously the general expectation was that the first doses wouldn’t be available until mid October.”We actually anticipate being able to start receiving orders for the vaccine by early October, and actually vaccine going out and being distributed by providers by the first week of October,” Dr. Jay Butler, head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) H1N1 Vaccine Task Force, said at a news briefing today.”Initially we anticipate that about 3.4 million doses of vaccine will be available,” he said. “Additional doses may be available as well, but 3.4 million is the hard number we have now. All of that is the nasal spray vaccine.”The live attenuated vaccine from MedImmune is indicated for children and adults aged 2 through 49, under the approval granted by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on Sep 15.The vaccine will be allocated to states in proportion to population. Under a centralized distribution system set up by the CDC, vaccination providers request doses from their state health department. States will screen the requests and then place orders with the CDC, which will transmit orders to McKesson Corp., the company handling the distribution.Local decisions importantWhile the doses are recommended first for high-risk groups, such as pregnant women, healthcare workers, children, and adults with certain chronic health conditions, who actually gets the first doses will depend on local decisions and circumstances, Butler said.”In any given location the availability of the vaccine may actually vary. So oftentimes that decision of who is actually administered the vaccine may ultimately be decided by the provider and the patient,” he said.He said some states have identified maternity hospitals where they may want to send the first doses of vaccine, though that would require an injectable rather than the nasal-spray vaccine. States may also try to steer early doses to healthcare workers and to people who will be living with babies under 6 months old, he said.Vaccine will be shipped from four sites around the country to facilitate rapid distribution, Butler said, but added that he didn’t know the locations.The distribution system is an expanded version of what the CDC uses for its Vaccines for Children program, which involves about 40,000 providers. The agency expects about 90,000 sites to participate in the campaign.Not all of those 90,000 will be individual vaccination providers, Butler said today. Some may be retail chains that may redistribute vaccine to their outlets.Regarding vaccine dosage, the expectation is that children under age 10 will need two doses, while one dose will suffice for older children and adults, Butler noted today.(The age recommendations differ slightly among the three vaccines the FDA has approved for use in children. For MedImmune the indication is two doses for children 2 through 9 years old; for Novartis it is two doses for ages 4 through 8, and for Sanofi Pasteur, two doses for ages 6 months through 8 years.)The CDC has been predicting that about 45 million to 50 million doses of vaccine will become available in mid October, followed by about 20 million a week after that, reaching a total of 195 million in December. Butler reaffirmed that forecast today.At today’s briefing, Dr. Dan Jernigan, deputy director of the CDC Influenza Division, emphasized that the extent of flu activity is very unusual for this time of year, with some flu in every state and widespread cases in 21 states.From monitoring at outpatient clinics and emergency rooms around the country, “What we’re finding is there is an increased amount of folks coming into clinics with influenza; it’s about twice at least what we would expect at this time of year,” he said.”We expect to see a whole lot more illness in coming weeks and throughout the flu season,” Jernigan said.As for hospital cases, he said, “What we see so far is there is some increase in the rate of hospitalization for children and young adults, but it’s not up at the same levels we see during seasonal flus.”Jernigan cited “considerable” flu activity in the Southeast, where schools opened earlier than elsewhere, but did not mention any other regional hot spots.The vast majority of viruses in circulation are the novel H1N1, and they remain well matched to the vaccine that’s on its way, he said.In response to a question, Butler said people who have had a recent flu-like illness should still get the H1N1 vaccine if they are in a target group unless they had a confirmed case of H1N1.”People who have actually been infected with the 2009 H1N1 virus likely do have some immunity,” he said. But most cases were not lab-confirmed, and other flu strains, as well as other respiratory viruses, have circulated during the epidemic, he noted.Global picture variesIn other developments, the World Health Organization (WHO) in its weekly update reported varying levels of H1N1 activity across the globe.The United States is seeing increased flu activity, most notably in the South, Southeast, and Northeast, whereas activity remains low in Canada, the WHO said. Europe and Central Asia also have low activity overall, but France is seeing increases, and localized activity is reported in several European countries and Israel.Flu activity in Japan is holding above the seasonal epidemic threshold, the WHO said. Meanwhile, much of South and Southeast Asia has regional or widespread outbreaks, with cases increasing particularly in India and Bangladesh. Regional to widespread activity also continues to be the story in tropical parts of Central and South America.In temperate parts of the Southern Hemisphere, flu continues to wane or has sunk to the seasonal baseline in most countries, the WHO said.Twenty-six cases of oseltamivir-resistant H1N1 flu have been identified globally, the agency said. Another 10,000 isolates have been tested and found sensitive to the antiviral.See also: CDC’s flu update for the week that ended Sept 12http://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/Sep 18 WHO updatehttp://www.who.int/csr/don/2009_09_18/en/index.htmllast_img read more

Syracuse turns to bulldozing duo in revamped goal-line package

first_img Published on October 6, 2012 at 2:20 am Contact Michael: mjcohe02@syr.edu | @Michael_Cohen13 One was a linebacker by title and a special teams lifer by all remaining criteria. The other was a stingily used sophomore running back that came to college overweight and still needed to shed a few pounds this past offseason.Until Saturday, both were basically irrelevant through the first five weeks of Syracuse’s 1-3 start. The former, Lewellyn Coker had registered a single tackle, while the latter, Adonis Ameen-Moore, had yet to step on the field in 2012.But during the bye week, and following consecutive dismal performances in goal line situations, their numbers were called by the Syracuse coaching staff. Coker switched positions — changing sides of the ball from defense to offense to become a lead-blocking fullback. And Ameen-Moore would finally assume the role his 5-foot-10-inch, 239-pound frame was meant to play: wrecking ball.“I said, ‘Hey, let’s put Adonis in and find a fullback. I don’t care who it is, whoever is going to knock somebody’s head off,’” Syracuse offensive coordinator Nathaniel Hackett said.It marked the birth of a duo that can only be described as bizarre, that could have never been predicted and that proved wildly effective in Syracuse’s (2-3, 1-0 Big East) 14-13 win over Pittsburgh on Friday. Running behind Coker and a jumbo-sized left side of the offensive line, Ameen-Moore pounded home the Orange’s only offensive touchdown and ran out the final 1:36 of the fourth quarter with a hard-nosed nature unseen so far this season.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe new tight red zone package, aptly named “Tank,” erased the ugly memories of SU’s goal-line woes in a narrow win over Stony Brook and a 17-10 loss on the road at Minnesota two weeks ago. Eight times the Orange failed to punch the ball in from inside the 5 yard line against SBU, a Football Championship Subdivision team. Against Minnesota, quarterback Ryan Nassib threw a costly interception with no reliable running attack with which to feel comfortable.“We’re this spread team, up-tempo, fast,” Hackett said. “But damn, what the hell do we do down there? And I think that was what messed us up.”The frustration for Hackett and head coach Doug Marrone boiled over shortly after the loss to Minnesota. The following Monday and Tuesday brought sleepless nights for both men, and a commitment to improving one of the team’s most glaring weaknesses.Trial and error ensued. Hackett said they tried one running back sets, overload formations and “a million different things” before settling on the Ameen-Moore/Coker combination.It looked good on tape toward the end of this week — Hackett said the Tank package was practiced every single day since last Thursday — and Ameen-Moore barreled his way into the end zone on his very first attempt from the 1 yard line to give Syracuse a 7-0 lead early in the opening quarter.“It feels great,” Ameen-Moore said. “I haven’t scored a touchdown since the 12th grade. … It felt wonderful, and I am just glad coach Marrone gave me the chance.”He ran behind the left side of an offensive line that benefitted tremendously from the return of All-Big East left tackle Justin Pugh. The 6-foot-5-inch, 297-pound senior missed the first month of the season after having offseason shoulder surgery and returned with a fiery passion his teammates fed off.Between Pugh, Coker, left guard Zack Chibane, tight end Beckett Wales and extra offensive lineman Nick Robinson, the Orange coaching staff gave Ameen-Moore a 1,322-pound wall to run behind that overwhelmed Pittsburgh’s defensive front. It ensured the one goal line play Hackett said they installed — the wonderfully descriptive “Run Left” — would work.“I went f***ing crazy when Adonis scored,” Hackett said. “I was so fired up.”The feeling resurfaced during the Orange’s final drive of the game, which began with 4:52 remaining and had the sole purpose of running out the clock to preserve a one-point win.After Syracuse picked up three first downs to melt the clock inside two minutes, Marrone and Hackett sent the “Tank” package back on the field to finish the game with one final move of the chains. Ameen-Moore carried the ball four consecutive times behind Coker and Co. for 13 yards, sealing the victory and igniting a wild celebration on the SU sidelines that shook off a five-game Big East losing streak.“(The coaches) were very pleased with Adonis, and he’s worked extremely hard to be in that position,” Marrone said. “Obviously it’s a very important position, so you have to have a very high level of trust.“(Coker) did a very good job in that fullback position. I was very proud of him.”Hackett said after the game that he apologized to Ameen-Moore during the bye week for not installing the goal-line package earlier, especially after making a promise to do so before the season even started.But his sophomore bludgeon wasn’t angry, upset or even frustrated. Instead he met with Hackett 24 hours after the package was put in place with a “glimmer in his eyes” that showed he was embracing his moment.Said Hackett: “When he looked at me and said, ‘I’m always ready,’ that was the best line.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

We haven’t signed Sulley Muntari – Hearts of Oak rubbish transfer rumours

first_imgAccra-based club Hearts of Oak have debunked claims that they have signed former Inter Milan midfielder Sulley Muntari.Speculation has been rife on social media that the club had added the Black Stars player to their ranks.However, Hearts of Oak denied this and stated on Twitter that all their new signings will be announced the club.They urged their fans to only rely on the club’s official social media handles for transfer information.“Hearts of Oak wants to notify the general sporting public that we have not signed Ghana International Sulley Muntari as it’s being reported by the media,” the club’s statement said.“Hearts is a Premier club in Ghana and will continue to set the standards, we, therefore, urge our supporters not to rely on information unless it comes from our official handles.”🗣 | @HeartsOfOakGH wants to notify the general sporting public that we have not signed Ghana International Sulley Muntari as it’s being reported by the media. Sulley is a great player and a friend of the club. We will continue to unveil the players we have signed.— Phobians (@HeartsOfOakGH) April 24, 202035-year-old Muntari has played for some of Europe’s biggest clubs including Inter Milan and AC Milan, winning the Champions League with the former, but has been without a club since he left Albacete last summer.However, the player appears to be desperate for a return to the game and was recently even eyeing up a call-up to the senior national team.@HeartsOfOakGH is the Premier club in Ghana and will continue to set the standards, we therefore urge our supporters not to rely on information unless it comes from our official handles.🔴💛🔵#AHOSC— Phobians (@HeartsOfOakGH) April 24, 2020He has earned 84 caps for the Black Stars and scored 20 goals.last_img read more