Integrity in spotlight as PSSI turns 90

first_imgAt age 90, the Soccer Association of Indonesia (PSSI) faces an uphill battle to restore its credibility after decades of turbulent affairs marked by graft, alleged match-fixing, stagnant development and rampant hooliganism.The PSSI celebrated its 90th anniversary on Sunday against the backdrop of the surprise resignation of Ratu Tisha Destria, the association’s secretary-general and one of its most influential figures in the past few years.Tisha, the first woman to hold such an important position in a male-dominated sport, announced her resignation Monday last week through her Instagram account, where she expressed her undying love for the sport. She had held the post since July 2017. Celebrating the milestone event under the pall of the COVID-19 outbreak, PSSI chief Mochamad “Iwan Bule” Iriawan invited fans, officials, players and supporters to work hand-in-hand to weather the dire circumstances in the country.Indonesian soccer fans have already seen the Liga 1 and Liga 2 league competitions postponed last month, forcing clubs to send players and officials home. The postponement added to the financial difficulties faced by clubs, which have prompted cuts to wages for players and staff.“We will win this toughest of matches. We are all on the same team, so we must overcome these challenges together. What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger and tougher,” said Iriawan as he advised stakeholders to maintain their integrity in developing the national soccer industry.Over the past few years, the PSSI had been mired in match-fixing scandals that have tarnished its image and dragged down several of its top officials, despite deep links to the corridors of power. Most recently, former deputy chairman Joko Driyono was sentenced to one-and-a-half years in prison for tampering with evidence related to match-fixing allegations.PSSI’s misfortunes do not stop there, as violence among soccer fans still occurs across most of the national soccer scene.Critics have urged the PSSI to create a more positive atmosphere around league matches to eliminate brawls and hooliganism.Sports expert Djoko Pekik Irianto of the Yogyakarta State University said the association still needed to work on a number of fundamental issues, from governance and eliminating the soccer mafia to improving its youth development program.“Each division [in the PSSI] should carry out its programs in a professional manner and avoid any overlap [in management],” Djoko told The Jakarta Post earlier this week.“One of the issues [that pushed Tisha to resign] was an allegation that she had overstepped her authority.”As the association looks for Tisha’s replacement, the Indonesian Sports Scientists Association (APKORI) head said the PSSI needed to be very mindful of not making the same mistakes.“If the PSSI had been practicing good governance, [we wouldn’t need to worry about] the Liga 1 Putri disappearing again […] as the next secretary-general could simply revisit the idea,” Djoko said, referring to the women’s league.One of Tisha’s crowning achievements had been to revive the Indonesian women’s soccer league, but concerns have been raised following her departure from the association.Iriawan has since appointed executive committee member Yunus Nusi as acting secretary-general to fill the void left by Tisha.Separately, Akmal Marhali from soccer watchdog Save Our Soccer urged the PSSI to build up its integrity by focusing on transparent and accountable management.“The PSSI needs to listen [to its critics] – it should be managed professionally and prioritize its achievements,” Akmal told the Post this week.Iriawan said he realized that a heavy task awaited him, especially after world soccer body FIFA gave Indonesia the nod to host the Under-20 World Cup next year.“We also have to qualify for the 2024 Olympics and work on our big dream to participate in the 2030 World Cup. For the senior team right now, we want them to break into the Top 150 in the FIFA ranking,” he said.Topics :last_img read more

Governor Wolf Visits Johnstown Center of Excellence, Touts Strides Made in 2016-17 Budget to Combat Opioid Epidemic

first_imgGovernor Wolf Visits Johnstown Center of Excellence, Touts Strides Made in 2016-17 Budget to Combat Opioid Epidemic July 21, 2016 Human Services,  Press Release,  Public Health,  Substance Use Disorder Johnstown, PA — Governor Tom Wolf and Department of Human Services Secretary Ted Dallas visited a Center of Excellence today to discuss the significant strides made in the 2016-17 budget to combat the opioid abuse and heroin use epidemic in Pennsylvania. The Wolf Administration successfully secured the necessary funding for DHS to open 20 Centers of Excellence (COEs) statewide by October 1, 2016.“I am thrilled that by working with Republicans and Democrats, we have achieved this level of funding for our fight against this public health crisis,” said Governor Wolf. “Now that this year’s budget is complete, it is imperative that we all continue working together to focus on Pennsylvania’s opioid abuse and heroin use epidemic. While the budget allows us to expand treatment for individuals suffering from addiction, we can and should do more to address this matter that is plaguing all of our communities. My administration will keep its focus on this issue and I will continue preparing for the upcoming special session.”“The Centers for Excellence will provide vital, potentially life-saving coordination of care for Pennsylvanians struggling with the disease of addiction,” said Secretary Dallas. “Rather than just treating a person’s addiction, DHS will treat the entire patient through team-based treatment, with the explicit goal of integrating behavioral health and primary care and, when necessary, evidence-based medication assisted treatment. As our strategy involves both behavioral therapy and FDA approved medication that individuals take to help curb cravings and manage withdrawal symptoms, it can improve the odds of recovery.”Governor Wolf and Secretary Dallas visited Alliance Medical Services in Johnstown.“We needed to find the funding to expand services and make them more accessible. Under the Governor’s leadership, we were successful,” said Joe Pritchard, CEO of Pinnacle Treatment Centers, which oversees Alliance Medical Services. “The staff and clinicians of Alliance Medical Services, as well as other Pinnacle Treatment Centers sites around the commonwealth, understand that opioid addiction is an illness and that we need to re-think our approach regarding treatment for these patients. The Centers for Excellence approach of treating the whole person according to their individual needs while integrating services within the community underscores the model used at Alliance Medical Services and throughout Pinnacle.”The current path of treatment for people who have opioid-related substance use disorders can be confusing and difficult to navigate. The links between behavioral health treatment and physical health treatment are often broken or not made at all. This means people may drop out of treatment after they receive care for their physical symptoms, bypassing critical components of care such as behavioral therapies and connection to community supports that can lead to meaningful recovery from substance use disorder.The Centers of Excellence are a central, efficient hub around which treatment revolves. These centers will have navigators to assist people with opioid-related substance use disorders though the medical system, and ensure they receive behavioral and physical health care, as well as any evidence-based medication-assisted treatment needed.The use of medication (like buprenorphine, methadone, and naltrexone), coupled with wrap-around supportive services, can prevent people from relapsing and improve their chances for recovery, ultimately driving the aforementioned statistics in the opposite direction.The Department of Drug and Alcohol Programs will license the COEs as drug and alcohol providers that provide one of the three FDA-approved medications.DHS is currently working with its actuaries to determine whether additional COEs can be funded by analyzing the impact they will have on the physical and behavioral health Medicaid managed care rates.For more information about the Centers of Excellence, visit www.dhs.pa.govLike Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolfcenter_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

LAPFF welcomes EC concession on bank accounting concerns

first_imgThe Local Authority Pension Fund Forum (LAPFF) believes the European Commission has made a major concession in addressing investor concerns over International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS).In a letter dated 17 May addressed to the European commissioner responsible for financial markets, Jonathan Hill, the LAPPF writes: “Your written answer to Syed Kamall MEP (E-106071/2015) confirms our belief on both points of law relevant to the endorsement criteria for IFRS – ‘the target’ (being a true and fair view of assets, liabilities, financial position and profit or loss) and ‘the purpose’ (being for creditor and shareholder protection).”The letter continues: “[It] represents a significant change to the landscape of accounting standard setting. Our evidence is that accounting firms, standard setters and regulators have been working on assumptions contrary to that.”This latest development in the long-running war of words follows a bid by commissioner Hill to reassure investors over the financial stability impact of IFRS, including the new financial instruments accounting standard IFRS 9. In a letter dated 10 May seen by IPE, he wrote: “We have analysed EFRAG’s advice, and we are satisfied the standard has been properly assessed against the endorsement criteria of the IAS-Regulation.“In particular, we believe the issues you previously raised in your letter to me of 23 September 2015 have been adequately addressed.”The spat over the purpose of and basis for financial reporting in the EU between some long-term UK investor interests and the wider accounting establishment dates back to the 2008 financial crisis.Since then, concerns have mounted that accounts prepared under IFRS – particularly by banks – could be defective.The LAPFF is among those long-term UK investors that have been vocal in their criticism that IFRS accounts let potentially insolvent financial institutions pay out dividends and bonuses.These investors have argued that dividends paid on the back of unrealised profits ultimately rebound on to shareholders and creditors.In December last year, the LAPFF called on the European Commission to clarify its position on IFRS 9.In particular, the LAPFF believes EFRAG has issued defective endorsement advice on the standard.The LAPFF first contacted the European Commission about the issue on 23 September.The local authority pension funds body warned that the EU Commission could in future face legal action were IFRS 9 to be endorsed.Meanwhile, this latter exchange of correspondence in the dispute leaves the LAPFF holding its line that IFRS 9 fails to meet the EU’s endorsement criteria.LAPFF chairman Cllr. Kieran Quinn wrote in the 17 May letter: “Given that, the only way IFRS 9 could ever comply with the criteria of EU law, having been designed on different premise, would be by accident.”The letter also reveals that the LAPFF continues to believe the EU’s advisory body on accounting matters, the European Financial Reporting Advisory Group (EFRAG), has misapplied the EU’s accounting endorsement criteria in its formal advice to the Commission.Cllr. Quinn said: “The EFRAG has instead operated by taking the assertions of the International Accounting Standards Board as if it defined the purpose of accounts, rather than the rule of law.”Of particular concern to the LAPFF is the EFRAG’s continued support in its 15 September 2016 advice for IFRS 9, despite the fact it could mean banks pay out dividends based on what the LAPFF calls “unreliable level 3 numbers (mark-to-model asset values)”.This means, the LAPFF argues, that the profit or loss and financial position (net assets) will not be correctly stated either.It also dismisses the EFRAG’s suggestion any deficiencies in IFRS 9 could be fixed through a footnote disclosure. “[W]ords might accompany the numbers as a note to the asset valuations,” it said, “but, whatever that note is intended to do, it does not compensate for the asset value, and the profit or loss and the financial position being wrong in the first place.”The LAPFF argues that, although the purpose of accounts is creditor and shareholder protection, commissioner Hill has, in his latest letter, applied a far looser criteria of the Capital Maintenance Directive (2012/30/EU), not the Accounting Directive (2013/34/EU).Moreover, the Capital Maintenance Directive requires shareholders to pay back illegal dividends.The European Union’s endorsement criteria for accounting standards are set out in the accounting directive.The IASB’s efforts to replace its existing financial-instruments accounting literature with IFRS 9 has proved to be controversial.In March, it emerged that the European Systemic Risk Board has not yet undertaken a study of the financial stability impact of the new standard.last_img read more

Anthony Davis scores 50 to lead Lakers past Timberwolves

first_imgPreviousLos Angeles Lakers’ LeBron James (23) is defended by Minnesota Timberwolves’ Robert Covington (33) and Andrew Wiggins (22) during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, Dec. 8, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)Los Angeles Lakers’ LeBron James (23) shoots against Minnesota Timberwolves’ Andrew Wiggins (22) during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, Dec. 8, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsLos Angeles Lakers’ Anthony Davis (3) and Minnesota Timberwolves’ Robert Covington (33) fight for a rebound during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, Dec. 8, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)Los Angeles Lakers’ LeBron James (23) goes to basket while defended by Minnesota Timberwolves’ Andrew Wiggins (22) and Robert Covington (33) during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, Dec. 8, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)Los Angeles Lakers’ Anthony Davis (3) drives to basket while defended by Minnesota Timberwolves’ Robert Covington (33) during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, Dec. 8, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)Minnesota Timberwolves’ Andrew Wiggins (22) shoots under pressure from Los Angeles Lakers’ JaVale McGee (7) during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, Dec. 8, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)Los Angeles Lakers’ Anthony Davis (3) shoots under pressure from Minnesota Timberwolves’ Andrew Wiggins (22) during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, Dec. 8, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)Minnesota Timberwolves’ Jarrett Culver (23) shoots against Los Angeles Lakers’ Danny Green (14) during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, Dec. 8, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)Los Angeles Lakers’ Dwight Howard (39) dunks against Minnesota Timberwolves during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, Dec. 8, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)Los Angeles Lakers’ Anthony Davis (3) shoots against Minnesota Timberwolves’ Jordan Bell (7) during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, Dec. 8, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)Los Angeles Lakers’ Danny Green (14) celebrates with teammates Dwight Howard (39) and Kentavious Caldwell-Pope (1) after making a 3-pointer during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, Dec. 8, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)Minnesota Timberwolves’ Robert Covington (33) goes to basket under pressure from Los Angeles Lakers’ Danny Green (14) during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, Dec. 8, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)Minnesota Timberwolves’ Jarrett Culver (23) and Los Angeles Lakers’ Dwight Howard (39) fight for a ball during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, Dec. 8, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)Minnesota Timberwolves’ Josh Okogie (20) goes to basket under pressure from Los Angeles Lakers’ Danny Green (14) during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, Dec. 8, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)Los Angeles Lakers’ LeBron James (23) dunks against Minnesota Timberwolves’ Gorgui Dieng (5) during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, Dec. 8, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)Los Angeles Lakers’ LeBron James (23) is defended by Minnesota Timberwolves’ Robert Covington (33) and Andrew Wiggins (22) during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, Dec. 8, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)NextShow Caption1 of 15Los Angeles Lakers’ LeBron James (23) is defended by Minnesota Timberwolves’ Robert Covington (33) and Andrew Wiggins (22) during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, Dec. 8, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)ExpandLOS ANGELES — “Well, you know, we’re confident,” Lakers coach Frank Vogel surmised before Sunday’s 142-125 victory over the Minnesota Timberwolves at Staples Center.“We’ve been putting up some big numbers. And obviously the plan of having two superstars offensively that are both willing passers, putting shooting around them and lob threats at the rim so far is working for us.“But,” Vogel concluded, in his best coachspeak, “it all comes down to the defensive end.”Turns out, even when the Lakers are not at their sharpest defensively, and even when LeBron James gets himself in foul trouble early and their other floor general Rajon Rondo is out with a tight hamstring — having Anthony Davis counts for a lot. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREUCLA alum Kenny Clark signs four-year contract extension with PackersHe counted for 50 on Sunday.Davis’ 39-point effort Friday at Portland was just an appetizer for Sunday, when he enjoyed the fourth 50-point game of his career and his first as a Laker, making his first six shots to put his new squad on his back before carrying them the rest of the way with another sterling performance.“My teammates kept giving me the ball,” said Davis, who said they were urging him to go for 50 at halftime. “I was still trying to play the right way, but I was being ultra-aggressive.”Davis delivered what Vogel termed an “old-school, smash-mouth” performance. The Lakers’ 6-foot-10 superstar finished 20 for 29 from the field and 10 for 10 from the free-throw line, where fans serenaded him with “M-V-P” chants.He added seven rebounds, six assists, four steals and a block in 39 minutes (the most this season with the exception of the Lakers’ overtime win Nov. 1 in Dallas). Every time the Lakers (21-3) needed to turn the tide, Davis was there to spin past defenders for a bucket, to throw down a lob, to flick a shot rimward or to back up and bury a jumper.“He’s great,” James said. “I mean, there’s nothing more you can say than that.”Davis’ prolific, proficient output — combined with James’ 32 points in 28 minutes — mitigated a productive night offensively by the Timberwolves, who shot 51.8 percent, had eight players score in double-digits and needed only until the start of the fourth quarter to exceed opponents’ 103.7 points-per-game scoring average against the Lakers.“I yelled at them for giving up 125 points tonight,” Vogel said. “I don’t think anybody really heard me. But, we gotta do better than that at that end of the floor — or if we score 142 points, we don’t.”After trailing by as much as 11 points early, Minnesota took their first lead with 5:46 to play before halftime, 52-51, on a 3-pointer by Andrew Wiggins.And when the Lakers built a 19-point lead in the third quarter, again the T-wolves surged, cutting it to 105-95 with 2:25 to go in the period.But Minnesota never got closer than 112-105 early in the fourth, as the Lakers outscored their guests, 32-22 in the final period. It was the Lakers’ fourth consecutive victory and Minnesota’s fourth straight defeat.James also recorded 13 assists despite being limited by four first-half fouls. He picked up No. 4 when he was called for a block on a Robert Covington drive, returning to the bench because of it with 2:27 to go in the first half.That event might have felt foreboding, especially without Rondo’s services available — except, you know, Davis.Minnesota didn’t score again in the first half after James went to the bench, as the Lakers launched on an 11-0 run — with Davis contributing six of his 27 first-half points in that span. L.A. went into the break in front, 73-65.“Tonight we had a challenge because our two primary quarterbacks, Rondo and LeBron — in foul trouble — were out,” Vogel said. “So we had to figure out how to impact the game, and obviously AD impacted the game on the defensive end, helping us get stops and get out on the break, and then the other guys stepped up. We know how to play through AD when we need to. That was a critical stretch in this victory.”Alex Caruso came off the bench to score 16 points on 6-for-11 shooting, Danny Green had 12 points and eight rebounds and And Dwight Howard celebrated his 34th birthday with eight points, two rebounds.center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

53 of employers cannot afford nonperformancerelated benefits

first_imgMore than half (53%) of employer respondents cannot afford to provide non-performance-related benefits because their organisation does not have sufficient budget, according to research by One4all Rewards.Its survey of 1,024 UK employees and 476 UK employers also found that 10% of employer respondents are currently making use of the tax exemption on trivial benefits. Trivial benefits are defined as those where: the cost of providing the benefit does not exceed £50 (or the average cost per employee if a benefit is provided to a group of employees and it is impracticable to work out the exact cost per person); the benefit is not cash or a cash voucher; the employee is not entitled to the benefit as part of any contractual obligation, including under salary sacrifice arrangements; and the benefit is not provided in recognition of particular services performed by the employee as part of their employment duties.The research also found:83% of employer respondents want to give regular bonuses and rewards to their employees in order to boost morale, motivation and loyalty.22% of employer respondents are aware of the tax relief available on trivial benefits, and 11% are planning to make use of them before the end of the current tax year.48% of employee respondents believe that receiving trivial benefits would improve their morale, 35% say it would make them feel more loyal to the organisation, and 31% think receiving these benefits would motivate them to work harder.62% of employee respondents feel that a gift voucher or card which allows them to choose their own reward would have the biggest impact on their attitude towards work.47% of employee respondents say that they would appreciate a bonus or reward which is not linked to their performance at Christmas, 32% would like to receive a bonus after a particularly busy period at work, and 26% would like to be given a bonus or reward on their birthday.Alan Smith (pictured), UK managing director at One4All Rewards, said: “There is lots of potential for British businesses to offer non-performance related benefits to their staff under the latest [HM Revenue and Customs] changes to the workplace benefits rule.“The changes to the workplace benefits rule have been introduced to help businesses similar to those we surveyed, which have limited budgets to reward their employees. We can see from the research that only a small proportion of businesses are currently making use of the tax exemption on trivial benefits, however, 11% of UK bosses are intending to make use of the tax exemption before the end of their tax year.“As Christmas was highlighted as the top season [employees] would like to receive a benefit, now is the perfect time for business leaders to consider making the most of the tax exemptions on non-performance-related trivial benefits.”last_img read more