9 great reads from CNET this week

first_img Tags Sep 1 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors • 0 Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean it Aug 31 • iPhone XR vs. iPhone 8 Plus: Which iPhone should you buy? The end of the year is near, even if the news cycle doesn’t seem to have noticed. GoFundMe returned more than $400,000 after learning one of the site’s campaigns was a scam. Fortnite, the shoot-’em-up video game, is reportedly set to turn a cool $3 billion in profit this year. And Silicon Valley billionaire Reid Hoffman apologized for unwittingly funding an Alabama disinformation campaign. If you missed any of the action, now’s your chance to catch up. And don’t worry… there’ll be plenty more in 2019. You thought the net neutrality fight was over? Think againTime’s run out to restore the rules using a legislative loophole. The fight, however, is far from over. Sarah Tew/CNET From NASA to SpaceX, 2018 was a great year for space news The launch of the Falcon Heavy rocket headlined a year of marvelous space milestones. deyhrbkvqaau6kd Virgin Galactic Here’s why Cher’s was the must-follow Twitter account of the yearThe global superstar is the antithesis of all the wrong types of tweeters. "Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again" - UK Premiere - Red Carpet Arrivals Samir Hussein/Getty Images From iPhone XR to Galaxy S9, we just had the best year for phones ever Phones were fast, powerful and brimming with exciting features. The 2019 crop will likely be better. i-phone-xs-i-phone-xs-max-1 Angela Lang/CNET Facebook Watch may have been the best part of the social network’s bad year But it wasn’t that great. Jessica Miglio Jessica Miglio Google employees found voice in protest this yearYou’ll likely hear more. Google Walkout Me Too Protest James Martin/CNET Google Home’s 2018 in reviewOwning the smart home. google-home-hub-9 Chris Monroe/CNET Fighting fake news on social media is going to get harderThe shift to messaging and ephemeral content will prove challenging. FRANCE-INTERNET-COMPANY-STOCKS-FACEBOOK Joel Saget / AFP/Getty Images The best cars we drove in 2018You’ll want to drive ’em all. 2018 Porsche 911 GT3 Touring Steven Ewing/Roadshow ‘Hello, humans’: Google’s Duplex could make Assistant the most lifelike AI yet. Infowars and Silicon Valley: Everything you need to know about the tech industry’s free speech debate. Aug 31 • Best places to sell your used electronics in 2019 Share your voice NASA Facebook Google Instagram Porsche Snapchat SpaceX Tesla Twitter Volkswagen Apple WhatsApp See All Apple reading • 9 great reads from CNET this week Tech Industry Post a commentlast_img read more

US to resume refugee admissions from Muslim nations NKorea

first_imgUS Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen testifies to the Senate Judiciary Committee in Washington. Photo: AFPThe United States will resume admissions for refugees from 11 countries identified as presenting a high security risk, but with extra vetting for these mostly Middle Eastern and African nations, senior US officials said on Monday.The changes came after a 90-day review of refugee admissions from Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Libya, Mali, North Korea, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syria and Yemen by the State Department, Department of Homeland Security and intelligence agencies.The new rules are the latest changes to the US refugee program made by the administration of president Donald Trump to address what it sees as national security issues.Some of the administration’s actions, including an executive order to temporarily ban all refugees, have sparked lengthy court battles. Refugee advocates have said they see the administration’s actions as intended to reduce the number of refugees, particularly those from Muslim countries.During the review period, which lasted from late October to last week, admissions of refugees from those countries dropped sharply, according to a Reuters analysis of State Department data.The changes announced on Monday include additional screening for certain people from the 11 countries, and a periodic review of a list of countries identified as presenting higher security risks.The new guidelines were announced at a press briefing by senior administration officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity. They offered no details about which people from the 11 countries will be subject to the extra screening, citing security concerns.The list of “high-risk” countries was last updated by the Obama administration in 2015, the senior administration officials said.US Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen would like officials to factor in risks to the United States other than terrorism, such as transnational organized crime, a senior administration official said.During the briefing, officials said refugees will not be barred from admission to the United States solely on the basis of nationality.“The big picture is that there is no longer a refugee pause on countries, including the 11 high-risk countries, with these measures taking effect,” one senior administration official said in a briefing with reporters. “We’ll be resuming admissions with the new security measures in place.”In an address at the Wilson Center on Monday morning, Nielsen spoke about the new security measures, saying they “seek to prevent the program from being exploited by terrorists, criminals and fraudsters.”“These changes will not only improve security but importantly they will help us better assess legitimate refugees fleeing persecution,” she said.Refugee advocates said they worry the new security measures will block refugees from the 11 countries from admission to the United States.“Adding yet more hurdles to an already overly bureaucratic process will burden those seeking safety for themselves and their families,” Amnesty International USA said in a statement.Since becoming US president, Trump has imposed numerous limits on the refugee program, including capping the number of refugees allowed into the country in the 2018 fiscal year at less than half the number set by former President Barack Obama for 2017. He also issued an executive order pausing the refugee program pending a thorough review, instituted stricter vetting requirements and quit negotiations on a voluntary pact to deal with global migration.For each of the last three years, refugees from the 11 countries made up more than 40 per cent of US admissions. But a Reuters review of State Department data shows that as the 90-day review went into effect, refugee admissions from the 11 countries plummeted.Since 25 October, the day the 90-day review went into effect, 46 refugees from the 11 countries have been allowed into the United States, according to State Department data.last_img read more

Canine Influenza Reported In Texas — Two Cases In Harris County

first_img To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Share Listen X 00:00 /01:08 Ed MayberrySeveral cases of canine influenza have been reported in Texas — two cases in Harris County.Texas A&M’s Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory is monitoring several cases of canine influenza in Texas, including two in Harris County. Lori Teller is with the Meyerland Animal Clinic.“Most of the dog population in the area is not protected against it. It’s not one of the core vaccines that dogs get on a regular basis.”The symptoms are very similar to human flu symptoms.“They’ll run a fever. They’ll feel really bad, be very lethargic, may not want to eat. Sneezing, coughey, watery eyes, discharge from the nose, and they just really don’t want to get up and move at all.”Dogs exposed to other dogs — for example, at boarding facilities, dog parks and grooming salons — are at a greater risk of coming into contact with the virus.“The big thing to be aware of — most dogs that are otherwise healthy can go on and recover with supportive care. Young puppies and older dogs are at higher risk from getting secondary pneumonias.”Teller says owners should discuss their dog’s risk with their vet. There have been no reports of dog flu being spread to humans.last_img read more